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The Role of Cultural Clustering in Attracting New Immigrants

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  • Dominique M. Gross
  • Nicolas Schmitt

Abstract

This paper argues that new immigrants cluster in culturally homogeneous groups in the host country because of imperfect information. However, a pulling effect exists provided that the cultural communities are not too large. With a panel of migration flows to the major O.E.C.D. countries from the mid 1980s to the mid 1990s, it is shown that the existence of similar cultural communities attracts new immigrants. However, the effect is not homogeneous for all types of source and destination countries. Furthermore, the pulling effect is shown to fall to zero for cultural communities above a certain threshold size. Copyright Blackwell Publishing, Inc 2003

Suggested Citation

  • Dominique M. Gross & Nicolas Schmitt, 2003. "The Role of Cultural Clustering in Attracting New Immigrants," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 43(2), pages 295-318.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jregsc:v:43:y:2003:i:2:p:295-318
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Rotte, Ralph & Vogler, Michael, 1998. "Determinants of International Migration: Empirical Evidence for Migration from Developing Countries to Germany," CEPR Discussion Papers 1920, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. George J. Borjas & Richard B. Freeman, 1992. "Immigration and the Workforce: Economic Consequences for the United States and Source Areas," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number borj92-1.
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    Cited by:

    1. John I. Carruthers & Natasha T. Duncan & Brigitte S. Waldorf, 2013. "Public And Subsidized Housing As A Platform For Becoming A United States Citizen," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(1), pages 60-90, February.
    2. Michèle Belot & Sjef Ederveen, 2012. "Cultural barriers in migration between OECD countries," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 25(3), pages 1077-1105, July.
    3. Klaus Nowotny, 2009. "Regional Concentration of Migrants in Europe," WIFO Monatsberichte (monthly reports), WIFO, vol. 82(6), pages 445-457, June.
    4. Elise S. Brezis & Ariel Soueri, 2013. "Mobility of Students and Quality of Higher Education: An Empirical Analysis of the “Unified Brain Drain” Model," Working Papers 2013-11, Bar-Ilan University, Department of Economics.
    5. Gianluca Orefice, 2015. "International migration and trade agreements: The new role of PTAs," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 48(1), pages 310-334, February.
    6. Klaus Nowotny, 2011. "Welfare Magnets, Taxation and the Location Decisions of Migrants to the EU," WIFO Working Papers 393, WIFO.
    7. Buch, Claudia M. & Kleinert, Jorn & Toubal, Farid, 2006. "Where enterprises lead, people follow? Links between migration and FDI in Germany," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 50(8), pages 2017-2036, November.
    8. Bredtmann, Julia & Nowotny, Klaus & Otten, Sebastian, 2017. "Linguistic distance, networks and migrants' regional location choice," Ruhr Economic Papers 725, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    9. Gross, Dominique M., 2006. "Immigration to Switzerland - the case of the Former Republic of Yugoslavia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3880, The World Bank.
    10. Peter Huber & Klaus Nowotny & Julia Bock-Schappelwein, 2010. "Qualification Structure, Over- and Underqualification of the Foreign Born in Austria and the EU," FIW Research Reports series II-008, FIW.
    11. Buch, Claudia M. & Kleinert, Jörn & Toubal, Farid, 2003. "Where Enterprises Lead, People Follow? Links between Migration and German FDI," Kiel Working Papers 1190, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    12. Klaus Nowotny & Dieter Pennerstorfer, 2011. "Ethnic Networks and the Location Choice of Migrants in Europe," WIFO Working Papers 415, WIFO.
    13. Julia Beckhusen & Raymond J.G.M. Florax & Thomas Graaff & Jacques Poot & Brigitte Waldorf, 2013. "Living and working in ethnic enclaves: English Language proficiency of immigrants in US metropolitan areas," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 92(2), pages 305-328, June.
    14. Beckhusen, Julia & Florax, Raymond J.G.M. & de Graaff, Thomas & Poot, Jacques & Waldorf, Brigitte, 2012. "Living and Working in Ethnic Enclaves: Language Proficiency of Immigrants in U.S. Metropolitan Areas," IZA Discussion Papers 6363, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    15. Anthony Edo & Yvonne Giesing & Jonathan Öztunc & Panu Poutvaara, 2017. "Immigration and Electoral Support for the Far Left and the Far Right," ifo Working Paper Series 244, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
    16. Nadiya Ukrayinchuk & Hubert Jayet, 2011. "Immigrant location and network effects: the Helvetic case," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 32(3), pages 313-333, June.
    17. Elise S. Brezis & Ariel Soueri, 2012. "Globalization and Migration: A “Unified Brain Drain” Model," Working Papers 2012-15, Bar-Ilan University, Department of Economics.
    18. Julia Bredtmann & Klaus Nowotny & Sebastian Otten, 2017. "Linguistic Distance, Networks and Migrants’ Regional Location Choice," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1712, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.

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