IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/sfu/sfudps/dp00-06.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Do Birds of a Feather Flock Together? Immigration Flows and Cultural Clustering in Host Countries

Author

Abstract

This paper presents a simple theoretical framework in which immigrants have a relative incentive to cluster in host countries where cultural characteristics and imperfect information sustain the segmentation of the labor market and a higher wage in foreign communities. The hypothesis is tested on a panel of immigration flows to OECD countries. The pull effect of cultural communities is supported and it is found that the minimum size of a given cultural community is around 5% of the foreign population. It is also found that the pull effect weakens as the community grows as predicted by the theoretical framework.

Suggested Citation

  • Dominique Gross & Nicolas Schmitt, 2000. "Do Birds of a Feather Flock Together? Immigration Flows and Cultural Clustering in Host Countries," Discussion Papers dp00-06, Department of Economics, Simon Fraser University, revised Feb 2000.
  • Handle: RePEc:sfu:sfudps:dp00-06
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sfu.ca/econ-research/RePEc/sfu/sfudps/dp00-06.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. John F. Helliwell, 1996. "Convergence and Migration among Provinces," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 29(s1), pages 324-330, April.
    2. Rotte, Ralph & Vogler, Michael, 1998. "Determinants of International Migration: Empirical Evidence for Migration from Developing Countries to Germany," CEPR Discussion Papers 1920, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Berg, Nathan, 2008. "Imitation in location choice," MPRA Paper 26592, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    International migrations; relative incomes; cultural clustering;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:sfu:sfudps:dp00-06. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Working Paper Coordinator). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/desfuca.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.