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Brain drain and development traps

Author

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  • Jean-Pascal Bénassy

    (PSE - Paris School of Economics - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - ENS Paris - École normale supérieure - Paris - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement, PSE - Paris-Jourdan Sciences Economiques - ENS Paris - École normale supérieure - Paris - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - INRA - Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Elise S. Brezis

    (Department of Economics [Israël] - Bar-Ilan University [Israël])

Abstract

This paper links the two fields of "development traps" and "brain drain". We construct a model which integrates endogenous international migration into a simple growth model. As a result the dynamics of the economy can feature some underdevelopment traps: an economy starting with a low level of human capital can be caught in a vicious circle where low level of human capital leads to low wages, and low wages leads to emigration of valuable human capital. We also show that our model displays a rich array of different dynamic regimes, including the above traps, but other regimes as well, and we link explicitly the nature of the regimes to technology and policy parameters.

Suggested Citation

  • Jean-Pascal Bénassy & Elise S. Brezis, 2013. "Brain drain and development traps," PSE-Ecole d'économie de Paris (Postprint) halshs-01118567, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:pseptp:halshs-01118567
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jdeveco.2012.11.002
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-01118567
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    as
    1. David Croix & Frédéric Docquier, 2012. "Do brain drain and poverty result from coordination failures?," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 17(1), pages 1-26, March.
    2. John Gibson & David McKenzie, 2011. "Eight Questions about Brain Drain," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 25(3), pages 107-128, Summer.
    3. Frederic, DOCQUIER & B. Lindsay, LOWELL & Abdeslam, MARFOUK, 2007. "A gendered assessment of the brain drain," Discussion Papers (ECON - Département des Sciences Economiques) 2007045, Université catholique de Louvain, Département des Sciences Economiques.
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    12. Michel Beine & Fréderic Docquier & Hillel Rapoport, 2008. "Brain Drain and Human Capital Formation in Developing Countries: Winners and Losers," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(528), pages 631-652, April.
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    19. Stark, Oded & Helmenstein, Christian & Prskawetz, Alexia, 1998. "Human capital depletion, human capital formation, and migration: a blessing or a "curse"?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 60(3), pages 363-367, September.
    20. Elise Brezis & Ariel Soueri, 2011. "Why do Students Migrate? Where do they Migrate to?," Working Papers 25, AlmaLaurea Inter-University Consortium.
    21. repec:ecj:econjl:v:122:y:2012:i::p:339-375 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Elise S. Brezis & Ariel Soueri, 2013. "Mobility of Students and Quality of Higher Education: An Empirical Analysis of the “Unified Brain Drain” Model," Working Papers 2013-11, Bar-Ilan University, Department of Economics.
    2. Pierre-Richard Agénor, 2017. "Caught In The Middle? The Economics Of Middle-Income Traps," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 31(3), pages 771-791, July.
    3. Agénor, Pierre-Richard & Canuto, Otaviano, 2015. "Middle-income growth traps," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(4), pages 641-660.
    4. Elise S. Brezis, 2016. "Why Migrate: For Study or for Work?," Economies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 4(3), pages 1-12, August.
    5. Leite, Duarte N. & Afonso, Óscar & Silva, Sandra T., 2019. "A tale of two countries: Directed technical change, trade and migratory movements," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 173-194.
    6. Pierre-Richard AGENOR, 2016. "Caught in the Middle? The Economics of Middle-Income Traps," Working Papers P142, FERDI.
    7. Kashif Iqbal & Yichu Wang & Khurshaid Khurshaid & Muhammad Haroon Shah & Muhammad Sohaib, 2021. "Current Trend and Determinants of Intentions to Migrate: Evidence From China," SAGE Open, , vol. 11(1), pages 21582440211, March.
    8. Elise S. Brezis, 2018. "Is Brain Drain passé? The Optimal Timing of Migration," Working Papers 2018-02, Bar-Ilan University, Department of Economics.
    9. Brezis Elise S., 2019. "Should individuals migrate before acquiring education or after? A new model of Brain Waste vs. Brain Drain," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 19(2), pages 1-11, June.
    10. Can Askan Mavi, 2017. "Can a hazardous event be another source of poverty traps ?," Working Papers hal-01522087, HAL.
    11. Zhaobin Fan & Hui Li, 2019. "International Migration, Human Capital Composition And Middle-Income Traps," The Singapore Economic Review (SER), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 64(04), pages 883-897, September.
    12. Elise S. Brezis & Ariel Soueri, 2012. "Globalization and Migration: A “Unified Brain Drain” Model," Working Papers 2012-15, Bar-Ilan University, Department of Economics.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Brain drain; Development traps; Human capital; Migration;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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