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Brain Drain from Turkey: Survey Evidence of Student Non-Return

Listed author(s):
  • Aysit Tansel

    ()

    (Department of Economics, Middle East Technical University)

  • Nil Demet Gungor

The 'brain drain' phenomenon has been widely investigated since the mid-1960s both in academic circles and by policymakers. From the developing country perspective, the migration of skilled individuals is viewed as a threat to economic development, and as a costly subsidy from the poor nations to the rich. The focus of this paper is on the return intentions of Turkish students studying overseas. Turkey's first 'brain drain' wave began in the 1960s, with doctors and engineers among the first group of emigrants. Various factors have been cited as important for student non-return, including political instability, lower salaries and lack of employment opportunities in the home country when studies are completed, as well as a preference to live abroad. The current study presents the findings of a survey conducted by the authors during the first half of 2002, which investigates the return intentions of Turkish students studying abroad at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The aim of the paper is to analyse the new evidence on the return intentions of Turkish students studying abroad in the hope of providing some insights into possible factors that may be important in explaining Turkish student non-return.

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Paper provided by Economic Research Forum in its series Working Papers with number 0307.

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Length: 26 pages
Date of creation: 03 2003
Date of revision: 03 2003
Publication status: Published by The Economic Research Forum (ERF)
Handle: RePEc:erg:wpaper:0307
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  1. Tansel, Aysit, 1994. "Wage employment, earnings and returns to schooling for men and women in Turkey," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 305-320.
  2. Tansel, Aysit, 2002. "Determinants of school attainment of boys and girls in Turkey: individual, household and community factors," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(5), pages 455-470, October.
  3. Kao, Charles H C & Lee, Jae Won, 1973. "An Empirical Analysis of China's Brain Drain into the United States," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 21(3), pages 500-513, April.
  4. Kwok, Viem & Leland, Hayne, 1982. "An Economic Model of the Brain Drain," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 72(1), pages 91-100, March.
  5. Tain-Jy Chen & Hsien-Yang Su, 1995. "On the-job training as a cause of brain drain," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 131(3), pages 526-541, September.
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