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Microeconomic determinants of skilled migration: The case of Suriname

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  • Dulam, T.W.
  • Franses, Ph.H.B.F.

Abstract

__Abstract__ Suriname witnesses a brain drain, in particular to the Netherlands. We study the determinants of this brain drain for skilled individuals, where we rely on an adaptation of the survey proposed in Gibson and McKenzie (2011). We managed to interview a unique set of 286 former top students, who studied in Suriname and now work and live either in the Netherlands or Suriname. We find that important determinants for skilled migration are (1) the social economic status, (2) whether the student enjoyed education in the capital city of Suriname, (3) the pure science courses taken at high school, (4) the social attachment with the country, and (5) the difference in economic growth between the home and destination country. We discuss the implications for policy makers.

Suggested Citation

  • Dulam, T.W. & Franses, Ph.H.B.F., 2014. "Microeconomic determinants of skilled migration: The case of Suriname," Econometric Institute Research Papers EI 2014-21, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Erasmus School of Economics (ESE), Econometric Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:ems:eureir:76073
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Docquier, Frederic & Rapoport, Hillel, 2004. "Skilled migration: the perspective of developing countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3382, The World Bank.
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    5. Frédéric Docquier & B. Lindsay Lowell & Abdeslam Marfouk, 2009. "A Gendered Assessment of Highly Skilled Emigration," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 35(2), pages 297-321, June.
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    12. Tina Dulam & Philip Hans Franses, 2015. "Emigration, wage differentials and brain drain: the case of Suriname," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(23), pages 2339-2347, May.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    emigration; return migration; income; brain drain;

    JEL classification:

    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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