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Emigration, wage differentials and brain drain: The case of Suriname

Author

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  • Dulam, T.W.
  • Franses, Ph.H.B.F.

Abstract

In this paper we examine two hypotheses concerning emigration. The first hypothesis is that emigration is positively correlated with wage differentials. The second hypothesis concerns a positive correlation between emigration and higher education in the sending country (the so-called brain gain hypothesis). We analyze unique time series data for Suriname for 1972-2009, for which we fit error correction models to disentangle short-run from long-run effects. We document moderate support for the first hypothesis, but we find strong support for the brain drain (and not brain gain) hypothesis. We conclude with implications of our findings for Suriname.

Suggested Citation

  • Dulam, T.W. & Franses, Ph.H.B.F., 2011. "Emigration, wage differentials and brain drain: The case of Suriname," Econometric Institute Research Papers EI 2011-33, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Erasmus School of Economics (ESE), Econometric Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:ems:eureir:26710
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Eggert, Wolfgang & Krieger, Tim & Meier, Volker, 2010. "Education, unemployment and migration," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, pages 354-362.
    2. Batista, Catia & Lacuesta, Aitor & Vicente, Pedro C., 2012. "Testing the ‘brain gain’ hypothesis: Micro evidence from Cape Verde," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, pages 32-45.
    3. William Easterly & Ross Levine, 1997. "Africa's Growth Tragedy: Policies and Ethnic Divisions," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(4), pages 1203-1250.
    4. Abdeslam Marfouk, 2007. "Brain Drain in Developing Countries," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 21(2), pages 193-218, June.
    5. Beine, Michel & Docquier, Frederic & Rapoport, Hillel, 2001. "Brain drain and economic growth: theory and evidence," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 275-289, February.
    6. Stark, Oded & Helmenstein, Christian & Prskawetz, Alexia, 1998. "Human capital depletion, human capital formation, and migration: a blessing or a "curse"?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 60(3), pages 363-367, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Franses, Ph.H.B.F., 2015. "Return migration of high skilled workers," Econometric Institute Research Papers 78065, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Erasmus School of Economics (ESE), Econometric Institute.
    2. Dulam, T.W. & Franses, Ph.H.B.F., 2014. "Microeconomic determinants of skilled migration: The case of Suriname," Econometric Institute Research Papers EI 2014-21, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Erasmus School of Economics (ESE), Econometric Institute.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    brain drain; education; migration;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General

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