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Trade Policy and Poverty Reduction in Brazil

Author

Listed:
  • Glenn W. Harrison
  • Thomas F. Rutherford
  • David G. Tarr
  • Angelo Gurgel

Abstract

Using a multi-region CGE model, we evaluate the regional, multilateral and unilateral trade policy options of MERCOSUR from the perspective of the welfare of all potential partners. In Brazil, we focus on poverty impacts. We find that the poorest households in Brazil experience percentage gains of between 1.5 to 5.5 percent of their consumption, which is about three to four times the average for Brazil. Protection in Brazil favors capital intensive manufacturing relative to unskilled labor intensive agriculture and manufacturing. So trade liberalization raises the return to unskilled labor relative to capital, thereby helping the poor.

Suggested Citation

  • Glenn W. Harrison & Thomas F. Rutherford & David G. Tarr & Angelo Gurgel, 2004. "Trade Policy and Poverty Reduction in Brazil," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 276, Central Bank of Chile.
  • Handle: RePEc:chb:bcchwp:276
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    Cited by:

    1. Harris, Richard G. & Robertson, Peter E., 2013. "Trade, wages and skill accumulation in the emerging giants," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(2), pages 407-421.
    2. Kym Anderson & Will Martin & Dominique van der Mensbrugghe, 2006. "Doha Merchandise Trade Reform: What Is at Stake for Developing Countries?," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 20(2), pages 169-195.
    3. Fernando Borraz & Daniel Ferrés & Máximo Rossi, 2013. "Assessment of the distributive impact of national trade reforms in Brazil," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 11(2), pages 215-235, June.
    4. Edson Paulo Domingues & Kênia Barreiro de Souza, 2012. "The Welfare Impacts of Changes in the Brazilian Domestic Work Market," Working Papers 96, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.
    5. Fida Karam & Bernard Decaluwé, 2007. "Les effets de la migration sur le chômage marocain : une analyse en équilibre général calculable statique," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne bla07016, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
    6. Carlos Azzoni & Jonathan Brooks & Joaquim Guilhoto & Scott McDonald, 2007. "Who in Brazil Will Gain from Global Trade Reforms?," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 30(10), pages 1568-1593, October.
    7. Fida KARAM & Bernard DECALUWÉ, "undated". "Migration Impact on Moroccan Unemployment: a Static Computable General Equilibrium Analysis," EcoMod2008 23800058, EcoMod.
    8. Rutherford, Thomas & Tarr, David & Shepotylo, Oleksandr, 2005. "The impact on Russia of WTO accession and the Doha agenda : the importance of liberalization of barriers against foreign direct investment in services for growth and poverty reduction," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3725, The World Bank.
    9. Jesper Jensen & David Tarr, 2014. "Deep Trade Policy Options for Armenia: The Importance of Trade Facilitation, Services and Standards Liberalization," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: APPLIED TRADE POLICY MODELING IN 16 COUNTRIES Insights and Impacts from World Bank CGE Based Projects, chapter 19, pages 453-508 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    10. Silvia Laens & María Inés Terra, 2005. "MERCOSUR: Asymmetries and Strengthening of the Customs Union: Options for the Common External Tariff," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 2923, Inter-American Development Bank.
    11. Jensen, Jesper & Tarr, David G., 2010. "Regional trade policy options for Tanzania : the importance of services commitments," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5481, The World Bank.
    12. Jeong-Soo OH & Phouphet Kyophilavong, 2015. "Trade Liberalization and Poverty in Developing Countries: Literature Survey," International Journal of Economics and Empirical Research (IJEER), The Economics and Social Development Organization (TESDO), vol. 3(2), pages 86-94, Fabruary.
    13. Tarr, David G., 2013. "Putting Services and Foreign Direct Investment with Endogenous Productivity Effects in Computable General Equilibrium Models," Handbook of Computable General Equilibrium Modeling, Elsevier.
    14. Thomas F. Rutherford & David G. Tarr, 2014. "Poverty effects of Russia's WTO accession: Modeling “real” households with endogenous productivity effects," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: APPLIED TRADE POLICY MODELING IN 16 COUNTRIES Insights and Impacts from World Bank CGE Based Projects, chapter 12, pages 287-306 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    15. Rutherford, Thomas & Tarr, David & Shepotylo, Oleksandr, 2005. "Poverty effects of Russia's WTO accession : modeling"real"households and endogenous productivity effects," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3473, The World Bank.
    16. Ernesto Valenzuela & Kym Anderson & Thomas Hertel, 2008. "Impacts of trade reform: sensitivity of model results to key assumptions," International Economics and Economic Policy, Springer, vol. 4(4), pages 395-420, February.
    17. Countryman, Amanda & Ufer, Danielle, 2016. "Potential Poverty Effects of the Special Safeguard Mechanism: the Case of Wheat," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 236023, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    18. Rutherford, Thomas & Tarr, David, 2008. "Regional household and poverty effects of Russia's accession to the world trade organization," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4570, The World Bank.
    19. Porzecanski, Arturo C., 2014. "Brazil’s Place in the Global Economy," MPRA Paper 54257, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations
    • R10 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - General

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