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Labor Outflows and Labor Inflows in Puerto Rico

Listed author(s):
  • George J. Borjas

Although a sizable fraction of the Puerto Rican–born population moved to the United States, the island also received large inflows of persons born outside Puerto Rico. Hence Puerto Rico provides a unique setting for examining how labor inflows and outflows coexist and measuring the mirror†image wage impact of these flows. The study yields two findings. First, the skills of the out†migrants differ from those of the in†migrants. Puerto Rico attracts high†skill in†migrants and exports low†skill workers. Second, the two flows have opposing effects on wages: in†migrants lower the wage of competing workers, and out†migrants increase the wage.

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File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/527521
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Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Human Capital.

Volume (Year): 2 (2008)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 32-68

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:jhucap:v:2:i:1:y:2008:p:32-68
DOI: 10.1086/527521
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JHC/

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  1. David Card & Thomas Lemieux, 2000. "Can Falling Supply Explain the Rising Return to College for Younger Men? A Cohort-Based Analysis," NBER Working Papers 7655, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. David Card, 2005. "Is the New Immigration Really so Bad?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(507), pages 300-323, November.
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  12. George J. Borjas, 2003. "The Labor Demand Curve is Downward Sloping: Reexamining the Impact of Immigration on the Labor Market," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 118(4), pages 1335-1374.
  13. Abdurrahman Aydemir & George J. Borjas, 2007. "Cross-Country Variation in the Impact of International Migration: Canada, Mexico, and the United States," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 5(4), pages 663-708, 06.
  14. Mishra, Prachi, 2007. "Emigration and wages in source countries: Evidence from Mexico," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(1), pages 180-199, January.
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  17. Maria Enchautegui & Richard B. Freeman, 2005. "Why Don't More Puerto Rican Men Work? The Rich Uncle (Sam) Hypothesis," NBER Working Papers 11751, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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