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Low Skilled Immigration and WorkFertility Tradeoffs Among High Skilled US Natives

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  • Delia Furtado
  • Heinrich Hock

Abstract

This article examines the impact of low skilled immigration on the childbearing and labor supply decisions of high-education female natives of the United States. The authors find that an influx of low skilled immigrants to a city attenuates the negative relationship between female labor force participation (LFP) and fertility, leading to an increase in the proportion of women that both work and have a young child in the home. The authors argue that the smaller LFP-fertility tradeoff attributable to immigrant workers arises due to reductions in cost of childrearing. Whereas most immigration research focuses on the reduced employment prospects of natives, this paper considers the potential benefits of immigration to high skilled native women.

Suggested Citation

  • Delia Furtado & Heinrich Hock, 2010. "Low Skilled Immigration and WorkFertility Tradeoffs Among High Skilled US Natives," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 9299538de78f420b985af1fa9, Mathematica Policy Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:mpr:mprres:9299538de78f420b985af1fa97471868
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Matthijs Warrens, 2008. "On Association Coefficients for 2×2 Tables and Properties That Do Not Depend on the Marginal Distributions," Psychometrika, Springer;The Psychometric Society, vol. 73(4), pages 777-789, December.
    2. Card, David, 2001. "Immigrant Inflows, Native Outflows, and the Local Labor Market Impacts of Higher Immigration," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 19(1), pages 22-64, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Forlani, Emanuele & Lodigiani, Elisabetta & Mendolicchio, Concetta, 2013. "The impact of low-skilled immigration on female labour supply," IAB Discussion Paper 201320, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    2. Hippolyte d'Albis & Ekrame Boubtane & Dramane Coulibaly, 2016. "Immigration Policy and Macroeconomic Performance in France," Annals of Economics and Statistics, GENES, issue 121-122, pages 279-308.
    3. Tiago Freire, 2016. "How The 1978 Foreign Domestic Workers Law Increased The Labor Supply Of Singaporean Women," The Singapore Economic Review (SER), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 61(05), pages 1-19, December.
    4. Delia Furtado, 2016. "Fertility Responses of High-Skilled Native Women to Immigrant Inflows," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(1), pages 27-53, February.
    5. Barone, Guglielmo & Mocetti, Sauro, 2011. "With a little help from abroad: The effect of low-skilled immigration on the female labour supply," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(5), pages 664-675, October.
    6. David E. Bloom & Dara Lee Luca, 2016. "The Global Demography of Aging: Facts, Explanations, Future," PGDA Working Papers 13016, Program on the Global Demography of Aging.
    7. Halldén, Karin & Stenberg, Anders, 2013. "The Relationship between Hours of Domestic Services and Female Earnings: Panel Register Data Evidence from a Reform," Working Paper Series 4/2013, Stockholm University, Swedish Institute for Social Research.
    8. Marcus H. Böhme & Sarah Kups, 2017. "The economic effects of labour immigration in developing countries: A literature review," OECD Development Centre Working Papers 335, OECD Publishing.
    9. David E. Bloom & Dara Lee Luca, 2016. "The Global Demography of Aging: Facts, Explanations, Future," PGDA Working Papers 13016, Program on the Global Demography of Aging.
    10. Delia Furtado, 2015. "Can immigrants help women “have it all”? Immigrant labor and women’s joint fertility and labor supply decisions," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-19, December.
    11. Aparicio Fenoll, Ainhoa & Kuehn, Zoë, 2014. "Does Foreign Language Proficiency Foster Migration of Young Individuals within the European Union?," IZA Discussion Papers 8250, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes & Almudena Sevilla, 2014. "Low-Skilled Immigration and Parenting Investments of College-Educated Mothers in the United States: Evidence from Time-Use Data," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 49(3), pages 509-539.
    13. repec:hal:journl:halshs-01162441 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Antman, Francisca M., 2018. "Women and Migration," IZA Discussion Papers 11282, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    15. Freire, Tiago, 2013. "How the 1978 changes to the foreign domestic workers law in Singapore increased the female labour supply," MPRA Paper 44448, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Ekrame Boubtane & Dramane Coulibaly & Hippolyte D'Albis, 2015. "Immigration Policy and Macroeconomic Performance in France," Working Papers halshs-01135389, HAL.
    17. Gurgen Aslanyan, 2012. "Immigration Control & Long-Run Population Welfare," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp453, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    18. Moshe Hazan & Hosny Zoabi, 2015. "Do Highly Educated Women Choose Smaller Families?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 125(587), pages 1191-1226, September.
    19. Romiti, Agnese, 2016. "The effects of immigration on household services, labour supply and fertility," IAB Discussion Paper 201640, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    20. Qingyan Shang & Bruce Weinberg, 2013. "Opting for families: recent trends in the fertility of highly educated women," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 26(1), pages 5-32, January.
    21. Duncan, Brian & Trejo, Stephen, 2011. "Low-Skilled Immigrants and the U.S. Labor Market," IZA Discussion Papers 5964, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    22. Delia Furtado, 2015. "Immigrant labor and work-family decisions of native-born women," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 139-139, April.
    23. Liat Raz-Yurovich, 2014. "A Transaction Cost Approach to Outsourcing by Households," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 40(2), pages 293-309, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Immigration Working Parents Chidbearing Labor;

    JEL classification:

    • J - Labor and Demographic Economics

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