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Networks Effects in International Migration : Education versus Gender

Author

Listed:
  • Michel BEINE

    () (CREA,University of Luxembourg, IRES and CES-Ifo)

  • Sara SALOMONE

    () (IRES, Université catholique de Louvain and Tor Vergata University)

Abstract

This paper analyses the impact of networks on the structure of international migration flows to OECD countries. In particular, we look at whether diaspora effects are different across education levels and gender. Using new data allowing to include both dimensions, we are able to analyze the respective impact of networks on the proportion of each category of migrant. Therefore, unlike the preceding literature on macro determinants of international migration, we can identify the factors that influence the selection in terms skills and in terms of gender. We find that network effects vary by education level but not by gender.

Suggested Citation

  • Michel BEINE & Sara SALOMONE, 2010. "Networks Effects in International Migration : Education versus Gender," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2010022, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
  • Handle: RePEc:ctl:louvir:2010022
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    File URL: http://sites.uclouvain.be/econ/DP/IRES/2010022.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Michel Beine & Sara Salomone, 2010. "Migration and Networks: Does Education Matter more than Gender?," CESifo Working Paper Series 3010, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Assaf Razin & Jackline Wahba, 2012. "Migration Policy and the Generosity of the Welfare State in Europe," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 9(4), pages 28-31, 02.
    3. Cobb-Clark, Deborah A, 1993. "Immigrant Selectivity and Wages: The Evidence for Women," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(4), pages 986-993, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Antman, Francisca M., 2018. "Women and Migration," IZA Discussion Papers 11282, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Simone Bertoli & Hillel Rapoport, 2015. "Heaven's Swing Door: Endogenous Skills, Migration Networks, and the Effectiveness of Quality-Selective Immigration Policies," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 117(2), pages 565-591, April.
    3. Artuc, Erhan & Docquier, Frédéric & Özden, Çaglar & Parsons, Christopher, 2015. "A Global Assessment of Human Capital Mobility: The Role of Non-OECD Destinations," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 6-26.
    4. repec:bla:ecinqu:v:55:y:2017:i:3:p:1265-1286 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Chiara Falco, 2015. "Education and migration: empirical evidence from Ecuador," Working Papers 297, University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics, revised Mar 2015.
    6. Neubecker, Nina & Smolka, Marcel & Steinbacher, Anne, 2012. "Networks and selection in international migration to Spain," University of Tuebingen Working Papers in Economics and Finance 35, University of Tuebingen, Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences.
    7. Carola Méndez Araya & Marcelo Lufin Varas, 2013. "¿Dónde están los inmigrantes en Chile?: Un análisis de Patrones Espaciales de Residencia por Municipalidades," Documentos de Trabajo en Economia y Ciencia Regional 38, Universidad Catolica del Norte, Chile, Department of Economics, revised Mar 2013.
    8. Bertoli, Simone & Ruyssen, Ilse, 2016. "Networks and Migrants' Intended Destination," IZA Discussion Papers 10213, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Naghsh Nejad, Maryam, 2013. "Institutionalized Inequality and Brain Drain: An Empirical Study of the Effects of Women's Rights on the Gender Gap in High-Skilled Migration," IZA Discussion Papers 7864, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Claire Naiditch & Radu Vranceanu, 2017. "The Legal Grounds of Irregular Migration: A Global Game Approach," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-01744601, HAL.
    11. Massimiliano Bratti & Chiara Conti, 2014. "The Effect of (Mostly Unskilled) Immigration on the Innovation of Italian Regions," ERSA conference papers ersa14p485, European Regional Science Association.
    12. Gans, Paul & Glorius, Birgit, 2014. "Internationale Migration: Forschungsansätze und -perspektiven," Forschungsberichte der ARL: Aufsätze,in: Räumliche Auswirkungen der internationalen Migration, pages 10-31 Akademie für Raumforschung und Landesplanung (ARL) - Leibniz-Forum für Raumwissenschaften.
    13. repec:bpj:bejeap:v:17:y:2017:i:2:p:10:n:2 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Nowotny, Klaus, 2013. "Institutions and the Location Decisions of Highly Skilled Migrants to Europe," Working Papers in Economics 2013-3, University of Salzburg.
    15. Maryam Naghsh Nejad & Andrew T. Young, 2014. "Female Brain Drains and Women's Rights Gaps : A Gravity Model Analysis of Bilateral Migration Flows," Working Papers 14-10, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    16. Falco, Chiara & Rotondi, Valentina, 2016. "The Less Extreme, the More You Leave: Radical Islam and Willingness to Migrate," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 122-133.
    17. Mathias Czaika & Christopher R. Parsons, 2017. "The Gravity of High-Skilled Migration Policies," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 54(2), pages 603-630, April.
    18. Falco Chiara & Rotondi Valentina, 2016. "Political Islam, Internet Use and Willingness to Migrate: Evidence from the Arab Barometer," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 22(1), pages 73-95, January.
    19. Miriam Manchin & Sultan Orazbayev, 2016. "Social networks and the intention to migrate," Development Working Papers 409, Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano, University of Milano, revised 01 Dec 2016.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Migration; Human capital; network/diaspora externalities; Gender;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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