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Border Enforcement and Selection of Mexican Immigrants in the United States

  • Fernando A. Lozano
  • Mary J. Lopez

Since 1986, the United States has made considerable efforts to curb undocumented immigration across the US--Mexico border, resulting in an increase in migration costs for undocumented immigrants from Mexico and placing a particularly heavy burden on undocumented immigrant women. Using data from the 1990, 2000 Decennial Census and the 2006--8 American Community Survey, this study finds three effects of rising migration costs for immigrants from Mexico: (1) A decrease in the relative flow of older and highly educated undocumented immigrant women relative to men; (2) An increase in the skill composition of immigrant women relative to men; and (3) An increase, due to stronger positive selection, in the average earnings of those groups most affected by increased migration costs, particularly women. This research has important implications in light of the barriers and increasing dangers that women across the globe may face when migrating.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1080/13545701.2012.752313
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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Feminist Economics.

Volume (Year): 19 (2013)
Issue (Month): 1 (January)
Pages: 76-110

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Handle: RePEc:taf:femeco:v:19:y:2013:i:1:p:76-110
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  1. Oded Stark & J. Taylor, 1989. "Relative deprivation and international migration oded stark," Demography, Springer, vol. 26(1), pages 1-14, February.
  2. Claudia Olivetti & Barbara Petrongolo, 2005. "Unequal Pay or Unequal Employment? A Cross-Country Analysis of Gender Gaps," Boston University - Department of Economics - Macroeconomics Working Papers Series WP2005-003, Boston University - Department of Economics, revised Oct 2008.
  3. Gordon H. Hanson, 2006. "Illegal Migration from Mexico to the United States," NBER Working Papers 12141, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Lopez-Acevedo, Gladys, 2006. "Mexico : two decades of the evolution of education and inequality," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3919, The World Bank.
  5. Markus Mobius & Raphael Schoenle, 2006. "The Evolution of Work," Working Papers 25, Brandeis University, Department of Economics and International Businesss School.
  6. Catherine J. Weinberger & Peter J. Kuhn, 2010. "Changing Levels or Changing Slopes? The Narrowing of the U.S. Gender Earnings Gap, 1959-1999," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 63(3), pages 384-406, April.
  7. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521029018 is not listed on IDEAS
  8. Cobb-Clark, Deborah A, 1993. "Immigrant Selectivity and Wages: The Evidence for Women," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(4), pages 986-93, September.
  9. Francine D. Blau & Lawrence M. Kahn, 2007. "Gender and Assimilation Among Mexican Americans," NBER Chapters, in: Mexican Immigration to the United States, pages 57-106 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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