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Migration and Networks: Does Education Matter more than Gender?

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  • Michel Beine
  • Sara Salomone

Abstract

This paper looks at the impact of networks on international migration flows to OECD countries. In particular, we look at whether diaspora effects are different across education levels and gender. Using new data allowing to include both dimensions, we are able to analyze the respective impact of networks on the proportion of each category of migrant. Therefore, unlike the preceding literature on macro determinants of international migration, we can identify the respective factors influencing the selection in terms skills and in term of gender. We found that network effects vary by education level but not by gender. Women are also found to be less directly dependent on migration costs unrelated to networks such as distance.

Suggested Citation

  • Michel Beine & Sara Salomone, 2010. "Migration and Networks: Does Education Matter more than Gender?," CESifo Working Paper Series 3010, CESifo Group Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_3010
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    File URL: http://www.cesifo-group.de/DocDL/cesifo1_wp3010.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Stephen Knowles & Paula K. Lorgelly, 2002. "Are educational gender gaps a brake on economic development? Some cross-country empirical evidence," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 54(1), pages 118-149, January.
    7. Lex Borghans & Bart H.H. Golsteyn & James J. Heckman & Huub Meijers, 2009. "Gender Differences in Risk Aversion and Ambiguity," Working Papers 200903, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
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    14. Chen, Natalie & Conconi, Paola & Perroni, Carlo, 2007. "Intergenerational Mobility of Migrants : Is There a Gender Gap?," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 815, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
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    Cited by:

    1. Michel Beine & Sara Salomone, 2013. "Network Effects in International Migration: Education versus Gender," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 115(2), pages 354-380, April.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    migration; human capital; network/diaspora externalities; gender;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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