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Sara Salomone

Personal Details

First Name:Sara
Middle Name:
Last Name:Salomone
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:psa906
http://sites.google.com/site/sarasalomonesara/home
Terminal Degree:2011 École des Sciences Économiques de Louvain; Louvain Institute of Data Analysis and Modelling in Economics and Statistics (LIDAM); Université Catholique de Louvain (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

(90%) Ecole Européenne Bruxelles III (European School Brussels III)

https://www.eeb3.eu/en/
Brussels

(10%) Comparative Regional Integration Studies (CRIS)
United Nations University

Brugge, Belgium
http://www.cris.unu.edu/
RePEc:edi:crunube (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Ilse Ruyssen & Sara Salomone, 2015. "Female Migration: A Way out of Discrimination?," CESifo Working Paper Series 5572, CESifo.
  2. Maëlan Le Goff & Sara Salomone, 2015. "Changes in Migration Patterns and Remittances: Do Females and Skilled Migrants Remit More?," Working Papers 2015-15, CEPII research center.
  3. Elisabetta Lodigiani & Sara Salomone, 2015. "Migration-induced Transfers of Norms. Political Empowerment?The case of Female Political Empowerment," Working Papers 2015:19, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".
  4. Elisabetta Lodigiani & Sara Salomone, 2012. "Migration-induced Transfers of Norms. The Case of Female Political Empowerment," DEGIT Conference Papers c017_058, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.
  5. Frédéric Docquier & Hillel Rapoport & Sara Salomone, 2011. "Remittances, Migrants' Education and Immigration Policy: Theory and Evidence from Bilateral Data," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1119, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  6. Michel Beine & Sara Salomone, 2011. "Network Effects in International Migration: Education versus Gender," DEM Discussion Paper Series 11-08, Department of Economics at the University of Luxembourg.
  7. Michel Beine & Sara Salomone, 2010. "Migration and Networks: Does Education Matter more than Gender?," CESifo Working Paper Series 3010, CESifo.

Articles

  1. Ruyssen, Ilse & Salomone, Sara, 2018. "Female migration: A way out of discrimination?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 224-241.
  2. Maëlan Le Goff & Sara Salomone, 2016. "Remittances and the Changing Composition of Migration," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 39(4), pages 513-529, April.
  3. Michel Beine & Sara Salomone, 2013. "Network Effects in International Migration: Education versus Gender," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 115(2), pages 354-380, April.
  4. Docquier, Frédéric & Marfouk, Abdeslam & Salomone, Sara & Sekkat, Khalid, 2012. "Are Skilled Women More Migratory than Skilled Men?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 251-265.
  5. Docquier, Frédéric & Rapoport, Hillel & Salomone, Sara, 2012. "Remittances, migrants' education and immigration policy: Theory and evidence from bilateral data," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(5), pages 817-828.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Ilse Ruyssen & Sara Salomone, 2015. "Female Migration: A Way out of Discrimination?," CESifo Working Paper Series 5572, CESifo.

    Cited by:

    1. Docquier, Frédéric & Tansel, Aysit & Turati, Riccardo, 2017. "Do emigrants self-select along cultural traits? Evidence from the MENA countries," GLO Discussion Paper Series 146, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    2. Beine, Michel & Bierlaire, Michel & Docquier, Frédéric, 2021. "New York, Abu Dhabi, London or Stay at Home? Using a Cross-Nested Logit Model to Identify Complex Substitution Patterns in Migration," IZA Discussion Papers 14090, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Neumayer, Eric & Plumper, Thomas, 2021. "Women’s economic rights in developing countries and the gender gap in migration to Germany," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 112557, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    4. Markowsky, Eva, 2022. "Culture, Female Labour Force Participation, and Selective Migrationː New Meta-Analytic Evidence," WiSo-HH Working Paper Series 65, University of Hamburg, Faculty of Business, Economics and Social Sciences, WISO Research Laboratory.
    5. CHABÉ-FERRET Bastien & MACHADO Joël & WAHBA Jackline, 2017. "Remigration Intentions and Migrants' Behavior," LISER Working Paper Series 2017-17, Luxembourg Institute of Socio-Economic Research (LISER).
    6. Killian Foubert & Ilse Ruyssen, 2021. "Leaving terrorism behind? Impact of terrorist attacks on migration intentions around the world," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 21/1021, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
    7. Lishuo Shi & Wen Chen & Jiaqi Xu & Li Ling, 2020. "Trends and Characteristics of Inter-Provincial Migrants in Mainland China and Its Relation with Economic Factors: A Panel Data Analysis from 2011 to 2016," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 12(2), pages 1-23, January.
    8. Joop Age Harm Adema & Cevat Giray Aksoy & Panu Poutvaara, 2022. "Mobile Internet Access and the Desire to Emigrate," CESifo Working Paper Series 9758, CESifo.
    9. Aksoy, Cevat Giray, 2021. "Refugees’ and Irregular Migrants’ Self-selection into Europe," SocArXiv bf7sy, Center for Open Science.
    10. Miriam Manchin & Sultan Orazbayev, 2018. "Social Networks and the Intention to Migrate," CID Working Papers 90a, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    11. Xiaomei Fan & Hongguang Liu & Zimeng Zhang & Jie Zhang, 2018. "The Spatio-Temporal Characteristics and Modeling Research of Inter-Provincial Migration in China," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 10(3), pages 1-14, February.
    12. Smith, Michael D. & Floro, Maria S., 2020. "Food insecurity, gender, and international migration in low- and middle-income countries," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 91(C).
    13. Rapoport, Hillel & Sardoschau, Sulin & Silve, Arthur, 2021. "Migration and Cultural Change," IZA Discussion Papers 14772, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    14. Lee, Taehoon & Peri, Giovanni & Viarengo, Martina, 2020. "The Gender Aspect of Immigrants' Assimilation in Europe," IZA Discussion Papers 13922, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    15. Bekaert, Els & Constant, Amelie F. & Foubert, Killian & Ruyssen, Ilse, 2021. "Longing for Which Home: Evidence from Global Aspirations to Stay, Return or Migrate Onwards," GLO Discussion Paper Series 930, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    16. Ruxanda Berlinschi & Ani Harutyunyan, 2016. "Do migrants think differently? Evidence from East European and post-Soviet states," Working Papers of Department of Economics, Leuven 551444, KU Leuven, Faculty of Economics and Business (FEB), Department of Economics, Leuven.
    17. Riccardo Turati, 2021. "Do you want to migrate to the United States? Migration intentions and Cultural Traits in Latin America," Working Papers wpdea2101, Department of Applied Economics at Universitat Autonoma of Barcelona.
    18. Bekaert, Els & Ruyssen, Ilse & Salomone, Sara, 2021. "Domestic and international migration intentions in response to environmental stress: A global cross-country analysis," Journal of Demographic Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 87(3), pages 383-436, September.
    19. Heidland, Tobias & Jannsen, Nils & Groll, Dominik & Kalweit, René & Boockmann, Bernhard, 2021. "Analyse und Prognose von Migrationsbewegungen," Kieler Beiträge zur Wirtschaftspolitik 34, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW Kiel).
    20. Simone Bertoli & Frédéric Docquier & Hillel Rapoport & Ilse Ruyssen, 2019. "Weather shocks and migration intentions in Western Africa: Insights from a multilevel analysis," Post-Print hal-02315013, HAL.
    21. BEINE Michel & MACHADO Joël & RUYSSEN Ilse, 2019. "Do potential migrants internalise migrant rights in OECD host societies?," LISER Working Paper Series 2019-15, Luxembourg Institute of Socio-Economic Research (LISER).
    22. Elveren, Adem Yavuz & Toksöz, Gülay, 2017. "Why Don’t Highly Skilled Women Want to Return? Turkey’s Brain Drain from a Gender Perspective," MPRA Paper 80290, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    23. Schmid, Lena & Renner, Laura, 2020. "The Decision to Flee: Analyzing Gender-Specific Determinants of International Refugee Migration," VfS Annual Conference 2020 (Virtual Conference): Gender Economics 224596, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    24. Cirillo, Marinella & Cattaneo, Andrea & Miller, Meghan & Sadiddin, Ahmad, 2022. "Establishing the link between internal and international migration: Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 157(C).
    25. Milasi Santo, 2020. "What Drives Youth’s Intention to Migrate Abroad? Evidence from International Survey Data," IZA Journal of Development and Migration, Sciendo & Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 11(1), pages 1-30, January.
    26. Nadiya Ukrayinchuk & Olena Havrylchyk, 2020. "Living in limbo: Economic and social costs for refugees," Canadian Journal of Economics/Revue canadienne d'économique, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 53(4), pages 1523-1551, November.
    27. Riccardo Turati, 2020. "Network-based Connectedness and the Diffusion of Cultural Traits," LIDAM Discussion Papers IRES 2020012, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    28. Marino Fages, Diego & Morales Cerda, Matías, 2022. "Migration and social preferences," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 218(C).
    29. Annalisa Frigo & Elisabetta Lodigiani & Sara Salomone, 2021. "For Children's Sake: Intergenerational Altruism and Parental Migration Intentions," LIDAM Discussion Papers IRES 2021030, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    30. Sandra Pellet & Marine de Talancé, 2021. "Is there a gender gap in health among migrants in Russia?," Erudite Working Paper 2021-11, Erudite.
    31. Aurelian-Petruș Plopeanu & Daniel Homocianu & Nelu Florea & Ovidiu-Aurel Ghiuță & Dinu Airinei, 2019. "Comparative Patterns of Migration Intentions: Evidence from Eastern European Students in Economics from Romania and Republic of Moldova," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 11(18), pages 1-21, September.
    32. Amr Abdelwahed & Anne Goujon & Leiwen Jiang, 2020. "The Migration Intentions of Young Egyptians," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 12(23), pages 1-38, November.
    33. Matthias Huber & Till Nikolka & Panu Poutvaara & Ann-Marie Sommerfeld & Silke Uebelmesser, 2022. "Migration Aspirations and Intentions," CESifo Working Paper Series 9708, CESifo.

  2. Elisabetta Lodigiani & Sara Salomone, 2015. "Migration-induced Transfers of Norms. Political Empowerment?The case of Female Political Empowerment," Working Papers 2015:19, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".

    Cited by:

    1. Marion Mercier, 2013. "The Return of the Prodigy Son: Do Return Migrants Make Better Leaders?," Working Papers id:5611, eSocialSciences.
    2. Diabate, Idrissa & Mesplé-Somps, Sandrine, 2019. "Female genital mutilation and migration in Mali. Do return migrants transfer social norms?," GLO Discussion Paper Series 329, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    3. Ilse Ruyssen & Sara Salomone, 2015. "Female Migration: A Way out of Discrimination?," CESifo Working Paper Series 5572, CESifo.
    4. Tuccio, Michele & Wahba, Jackline, 2020. "Social Remittances," GLO Discussion Paper Series 609, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    5. Batista, Catia & Seither, Julia & Vicente, Pedro C., 2019. "Do migrant social networks shape political attitudes and behavior at home?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 117(C), pages 328-343.
    6. Catia Batista & Julia Seither & Pedro C. Vicente, 2017. "Migration, political institutions, and social networks," NOVAFRICA Working Paper Series wp1701, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Nova School of Business and Economics, NOVAFRICA.
    7. Chankseliani, Maia, 2018. "The politics of student mobility: Links between outbound student flows and the democratic development of post-Soviet Eurasia," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 281-288.
    8. Riccardo Turati, 2020. "Network-based Connectedness and the Diffusion of Cultural Traits," LIDAM Discussion Papers IRES 2020012, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    9. Hillel Rapoport, 2018. "Diaspora externalities: A view from the South," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2018-25, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

  3. Elisabetta Lodigiani & Sara Salomone, 2012. "Migration-induced Transfers of Norms. The Case of Female Political Empowerment," DEGIT Conference Papers c017_058, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.

    Cited by:

    1. Frédéric DOCQUIER & Riccardo TURATI & Jérome VALETTE & Chrysovalantis VASILAKIS, 2016. "Multiculturalism and Growth: Skill-Specific Evidence from the Post-World War II Period," Working Papers 201624, CERDI.
    2. Marion Mercier, 2013. "The Return of the Prodigy Son: Do Return Migrants Make Better Leaders?," Working Papers id:5611, eSocialSciences.
    3. Frédéric Docquier & Riccardo Turati & Jérôme Valette & Chrysovalantis Vasilakis, 2020. "Birthplace diversity and economic growth: evidence from the US states in the Post-World War II period," Post-Print hal-02865160, HAL.
    4. Naghsh Nejad, Maryam & Young, Andrew T., 2015. "Want Freedom, Will Travel: Emigrant Self-Selection According to Institutional Quality," IZA Discussion Papers 9309, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Jérôme Valette, 2017. "Do migrants transfer productive knowledge back to their origin countries?," CERDI Working papers halshs-01425451, HAL.
    6. Leonid V. Azarnert & Slava Yakubenko, 2021. "Effects of Emigration on Gender Norms in Countries of Origin," CESifo Working Paper Series 9450, CESifo.
    7. Böhme, Marcus H. & Glaser, Toni, 2014. "Migration experience, aspirations and the brain drain theory and empirical evidence," Kiel Working Papers 1956, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW Kiel).
    8. Lisa Chauvet & Marion Mercier, 2014. "Do return migrants transfer political norms to their origin country? Evidence from Mali," PSE-Ecole d'économie de Paris (Postprint) halshs-01511026, HAL.
    9. Simone Bertoli & Francesca Marchetta, 2012. "Bringing It All Back Home Return migration and fertility choices," CERDI Working papers halshs-00659825, HAL.
    10. Ferrant, Gaëlle & Tuccio, Michele, 2015. "South–South Migration and Discrimination Against Women in Social Institutions: A Two-way Relationship," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 240-254.
    11. Chort, Isabelle, 2014. "Mexican Migrants to the US: What Do Unrealized Migration Intentions Tell Us About Gender Inequalities?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 535-552.
    12. Jean-Louis Combes & Christian Hubert Ebeke & Mathilde Maurel, 2013. "The effect of remittances prior to an election," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00826999, HAL.
    13. Simone Bertoli, 2015. "Does return migration influence fertility at home?," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 204-204, November.
    14. Tuccio, Michele & Wahba, Jackline, 2015. "Can I Have Permission to Leave the House? Return Migration and the Transfer of Gender Norms," IZA Discussion Papers 9216, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    15. Şule Akkoyunlu, 2013. "Migration-Induced Women’s Empowerment: The Case of Turkey," RSCAS Working Papers 2013/77, European University Institute.
    16. Artjoms Ivlevs & Roswitha M. King, 2014. "Emigration, remittances and corruption experience of those staying behind," Working Papers 20141411, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    17. Bogatzki, Tamara, 2021. "Heterogeneity in migration network effects across cultures," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Migration, Integration, Transnationalization SP VI 2021-102, WZB Berlin Social Science Center.
    18. Imran Arif & Adam Hoffer & Dean Stansel & Donald Lacombe, 2020. "Economic freedom and migration: A metro area‐level analysis," Southern Economic Journal, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 87(1), pages 170-190, July.
    19. Ademmer, Esther & Akgüç, Mehtap & Barslund, Mikkel & Di Bartolomeo, Anna & Benček, David & Groll, Dominik & Hoxhaj, Rezart & Lanati, Mauro & Laurentsyeva, Nadzeya & Lücke, Matthias & Ludolph, Lars & R, 2017. "2017 MEDAM Assessment Report on Asylum and Migration Policies in Europe. Sharing responsibility for refugees and expanding legal immigration," MEDAM Assessment Report on Asylum and Migration Policies in Europe, Mercator Dialogue on Asylum and Migration (MEDAM), number 182239.
    20. Sven Jung, 2014. "Employment adjustment in German firms [Betriebliche Beschäftigungsanpassung in Deutschland]," Journal for Labour Market Research, Springer;Institute for Employment Research/ Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), vol. 47(1), pages 83-106, March.

  4. Frédéric Docquier & Hillel Rapoport & Sara Salomone, 2011. "Remittances, Migrants' Education and Immigration Policy: Theory and Evidence from Bilateral Data," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1119, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.

    Cited by:

    1. Adejumo, Oluwabunmi & Efobi, Uchenna & Asongu, Simplice, 2020. "Financing Sustainable Development in Africa: Taking Stock, and Looking Forward," MPRA Paper 107493, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Maëlan Le Goff & Sara Salomone, 2016. "Remittances and the Changing Composition of Migration," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 39(4), pages 513-529, April.
    3. Mora-Rivera, Jorge & Cerón-Monroy, Hazael & García-Mora, Fernando, 2019. "The impact of remittances on domestic tourism in Mexico," Annals of Tourism Research, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 36-52.
    4. Azizi, SeyedSoroosh, 2018. "The impacts of workers' remittances on human capital and labor supply in developing countries," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 377-396.
    5. Bredtmann, Julia & Martínez Flores, Fernanda & Otten, Sebastian, 2018. "Remittances and the Brain Drain: Evidence from Microdata for Sub-Saharan Africa," EconStor Open Access Articles and Book Chapters, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 1-22.
    6. Michel Beine & Brian B. Burgoon & Mary Crock & Justin Gest & Michael Hiscox & Patrick Mcgovern & Hillel Rapoport & Eiko Thielemann, 2015. "Measuring Immigration Policies: Preliminary Evidence from IMPALA," PSE - Labex "OSE-Ouvrir la Science Economique" hal-01304219, HAL.
    7. Lesly Cassin, 2020. "The effects of migration and pollution on cognitive skills in Caribbean economies: a theoretical analysis," Working Papers 2020.03, FAERE - French Association of Environmental and Resource Economists.
    8. Frédéric DOCQUIER & Joël MACHADO, 2015. "Remittance and Migration Prospects for the Twenty-First Century," Working Papers P133, FERDI.
    9. Diego Alberto Sandoval Herrera & María Fernanda Reyes Roa, 2012. "¿Por qué los migrantes envían remesas?: Repaso de las principales motivaciones microeconómicas," BORRADORES DE ECONOMIA 010036, BANCO DE LA REPÚBLICA.
    10. Dmytro Vikhrov, 2014. "Immigration Policy Index," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp523, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    11. Ahmed, Junaid & Martinez-Zarzoso, Inmaculada, 2014. "What drives bilateral remittances to Pakistan? A gravity model approach," University of Göttingen Working Papers in Economics 209, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    12. Michael Kwame Dzordzormenyoh & Deion Perkins, 2022. "Immigration in the United States: Exploring the Factors that Predict Public Support for Police Stops Targeted at Illegal Immigrants & Immigrants with Criminal Background," Journal of International Migration and Integration, Springer, vol. 23(3), pages 1545-1566, September.
    13. Mukhopadhyay, Sankar & Zou, Miaomiao, 2018. "Will Skill-Based Immigration Policies Lead to Lower Remittances? An Analysis of the Relations between Education, Sponsorship, and Remittances," IZA Discussion Papers 11330, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    14. Giulia Bettin & Riccardo Lucchetti, 2016. "Steady streams and sudden bursts: persistence patterns in remittance decisions," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 29(1), pages 263-292, January.
    15. Elisabetta Lodigiani & Luca Marchiori & I-Ling Shen, 2016. "Revisiting the Brain Drain Literature with Insights from a Dynamic General Equilibrium World Model," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 39(4), pages 557-573, April.
    16. Simone Bertoli & Hillel Rapoport, 2015. "Heaven’s Swing Door: Endogenous Skills, Migration Networks, and the Effectiveness of Quality-Selective Immigration Policies," Post-Print halshs-01273241, HAL.
    17. Keerti Mallela & Sunny Kumar Singh & Archana Srivastava, 2020. "Estimating Bilateral Remittances in a Macroeconomic Framework: Evidence from top Remittance-Receiving Countries," Studies in Microeconomics, , vol. 8(1), pages 95-118, June.
    18. Kahanec, Martin, 2013. "Skilled labor flows : lessons from the European Union," Social Protection Discussion Papers and Notes 75529, The World Bank.
    19. Assaf Razin & Jackline Wahba, 2011. "Welfare Magnet Hypothesis, Fiscal Burden and Immigration Skill Selectivity," NBER Working Papers 17515, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    20. Bernard Poirine & Vincent Dropsy, 2018. "Diaspora growth and aggregate remittances : an inverted-U relationship ?," Post-Print hal-02133273, HAL.
    21. Bergh, Andreas & Mirkina, Irina & Nilsson, Therese, 2015. "Pushed by Poverty or by Institutions? Determinants of Global Migration Flows," Working Paper Series 1077, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    22. Adriana R. Cardozo Silva & Luis R. Diaz Pavez & Inmaculada Martínez‐Zarzoso & Felicitas Nowak‐Lehmann, 2022. "The impact of COVID‐19 government responses on remittances in Latin American countries," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 34(4), pages 803-822, May.
    23. Maëlan Le Goff & Sara Salomone, 2015. "Changes in Migration Patterns and Remittances: Do Females and Skilled Migrants Remit More?," Working Papers 2015-15, CEPII research center.
    24. Giulia Bettin & Andrea F. Presbitero & Nikola L. Spatafora, 2017. "Remittances and Vulnerability in Developing Countries," The World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 31(1), pages 1-23.
    25. Alexandra Tapsoba & Pascale Combes Motel & Jean-Louis Combes, 2019. "Remittances, food security and climate variability: The case of Burkina Faso," Working Papers halshs-02364775, HAL.
    26. Ahmed, Junaid & Martínez-Zarzoso, Inmaculada, 2016. "Do transfer costs matter for foreign remittances?," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal (2007-2020), Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW Kiel), vol. 10, pages 1-36.
    27. Vikhrov Dmytro, 2013. "Welfare Effects of Labor Migration," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp491, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    28. Giulia Bettin & Alberto Zazzaro, 2018. "The Impact of Natural Disasters on Remittances to Low- and Middle-Income Countries," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 54(3), pages 481-500, March.
    29. Kaczmarczyk, Pawel, 2013. "Money for Nothing? Ukrainian Immigrants in Poland and their Remitting Behaviors," IZA Discussion Papers 7666, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    30. Ahmed, Junaid & Martínez-Zarzoso, Inmaculada, 2015. "Do transfer costs matter for foreign remittances? A gravity model approach," Economics Discussion Papers 2015-12, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW Kiel).
    31. Alex Julca, 2013. "Can Immigrant Remittances Support Development Finance?," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 60(3), pages 365-380, May.
    32. Hillel Rapoport, 2017. "Who is Afraid of the Brain Drain? A Development Economist’s View," CEPII Policy Brief 2017-14, CEPII research center.
    33. Tunc Gursoy & Hector Perez-Saiz & Mounir Bari & Mr. Jemma Dridi, 2019. "The Impact of Remittances on Economic Activity: The Importance of Sectoral Linkages," IMF Working Papers 2019/175, International Monetary Fund.
    34. Imtiaz Arif & Syed Ali Raza & Anita Friemann & Muhammad Tahir Suleman, 2019. "The Role of Remittances in the Development of Higher Education: Evidence from Top Remittance Receiving Countries," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 141(3), pages 1233-1243, February.
    35. Imene Guetat & Dorsaf Sridi, 2017. "Institutional quality effect on remittances in MENA region," Middle East Development Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(1), pages 84-100, January.
    36. Ghassan, Hassan & Alhajhoj, Hassan R. & Balli, Faruk, 2018. "Bi-Demographic Changes and Current Account using SVAR Modeling: Evidence from Saudi Arabia," MPRA Paper 93013, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 01 Feb 2019.
    37. Besart Avdiu, 2018. "The Effect of Attitudes toward Migrants on Migrant Skill Composition," LIS Working papers 718, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    38. Björn NILSSON, 2019. "Education and migration: insights for policymakers," Working Paper 23ca9c54-061a-4d60-967c-f, Agence française de développement.
    39. Abbas, Syed Ali & Selvanathan, Eliyathamby A. & Selvanathan, Saroja & Bandaralage, Jayatilleke S., 2021. "Are remittances and foreign aid interlinked? Evidence from least developed and developing countries," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 265-275.
    40. Hassan Ghassan & Hassan Al-Hajhoj & Faruk Balli, 2019. "Bi-Demographic Changes and Current Account using SVAR Modeling: Evidence from Saudi Economy," Working Papers hal-01742574, HAL.
    41. Dmytro Vikhrov, 2017. "Immigration policy index," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 25(1), pages 3-46, January.
    42. Aomar Ibourk & Jabrane Amaghouss, 2014. "Impact of Migrant Remittances on Economic Empowerment of Women: A Macroeconomic Investigation," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 4(3), pages 597-611.
    43. Gildas Kadoukpè Magbondé, 2021. "How Sub-Saharan African Countries Students Choose Where to Study Abroad: The Case of Benin," Social Inclusion, Cogitatio Press, vol. 9(1), pages 278-287.
    44. Besart Avdiu, 2018. "The Effect of Attitudes toward Migrants on Migrant Skill Composition," CESifo Working Paper Series 6919, CESifo.
    45. Hassan B. Ghassan & Hassan R. Al-Hajhoj & Faruk Balli, 2018. "Bi-Demographic Changes and Current Account using SVAR Modeling," Papers 1803.11161, arXiv.org, revised Mar 2019.

  5. Michel Beine & Sara Salomone, 2011. "Network Effects in International Migration: Education versus Gender," DEM Discussion Paper Series 11-08, Department of Economics at the University of Luxembourg.

    Cited by:

    1. Michel Beine & Brian B. Burgoon & Mary Crock & Justin Gest & Michael Hiscox & Patrick Mcgovern & Hillel Rapoport & Eiko Thielemann, 2015. "Measuring Immigration Policies: Preliminary Evidence from IMPALA," PSE - Labex "OSE-Ouvrir la Science Economique" hal-01304219, HAL.
    2. Neumayer, Eric & Plumper, Thomas, 2021. "Women’s economic rights in developing countries and the gender gap in migration to Germany," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 112557, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Nina Neubecker & Marcel Smolka & Anne Steinbacher, 2017. "Networks And Selection In International Migration To Spain," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 55(3), pages 1265-1286, July.
    4. Artuc, Erhan & Docquier, Frédéric & Özden, Çaglar & Parsons, Christopher, 2015. "A Global Assessment of Human Capital Mobility: The Role of Non-OECD Destinations," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 6-26.
    5. Claire Naiditch & Radu Vranceanu, 2017. "The Legal Grounds of Irregular Migration: A Global Game Approach," Post-Print hal-01744601, HAL.
    6. Chiara Falco, 2015. "Education and migration: empirical evidence from Ecuador," Working Papers 297, University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics, revised Mar 2015.
    7. Bredtmann, Julia & Nowotny, Klaus & Otten, Sebastian, 2017. "Linguistic Distance, Networks and Migrants' Regional Location Choice," IZA Discussion Papers 11171, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    8. Bratti, Massimiliano & Conti, Chiara, 2014. "The Effect of (Mostly Unskilled) Immigration on the Innovation of Italian Regions," IZA Discussion Papers 7922, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    9. Simone Bertoli & Ilse Ruyssen, 2018. "Networks and migrants’ intended destination," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 18(4), pages 705-728.
    10. Miriam Manchin & Sultan Orazbayev, 2018. "Social Networks and the Intention to Migrate," CID Working Papers 90a, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    11. Simone Bertoli & Hillel Rapoport, 2015. "Heaven’s Swing Door: Endogenous Skills, Migration Networks, and the Effectiveness of Quality-Selective Immigration Policies," Post-Print halshs-01273241, HAL.
    12. Smith, Michael D. & Floro, Maria S., 2020. "Food insecurity, gender, and international migration in low- and middle-income countries," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 91(C).
    13. Gans, Paul & Glorius, Birgit, 2014. "Internationale Migration: Forschungsansätze und -perspektiven," Forschungsberichte der ARL: Aufsätze, in: Gans, Paul (ed.), Räumliche Auswirkungen der internationalen Migration, volume 3, pages 10-31, ARL – Akademie für Raumentwicklung in der Leibniz-Gemeinschaft.
    14. Falco, Chiara & Rotondi, Valentina, 2016. "The Less Extreme, the More You Leave: Radical Islam and Willingness to Migrate," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 122-133.
    15. Romano Piras, 2021. "Migration flows by educational attainment: Disentangling the heterogeneous role of push and pull factors," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(3), pages 515-542, June.
    16. Böhme, Marcus H. & Gröger, André & Stöhr, Tobias, 2020. "Searching for a better life: Predicting international migration with online search keywords," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 142(C).
    17. Mathias Czaika & Christopher R. Parsons, 2017. "The Gravity of High-Skilled Migration Policies," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 54(2), pages 603-630, April.
    18. Maryam Naghsh Nejad & Andrew T. Young, 2014. "Female Brain Drains and Women's Rights Gaps : A Gravity Model Analysis of Bilateral Migration Flows," Working Papers 14-10, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    19. Chiara FALCO & Valentina ROTONDI, 2016. "The Less Extreme, the More You Leave: Radical Islam and Willingness to Migrate," Departmental Working Papers 2016-04, Department of Economics, Management and Quantitative Methods at Università degli Studi di Milano.
    20. Bogatzki, Tamara, 2021. "Heterogeneity in migration network effects across cultures," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Migration, Integration, Transnationalization SP VI 2021-102, WZB Berlin Social Science Center.
    21. Antman, Francisca M., 2018. "Women and Migration," IZA Discussion Papers 11282, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    22. Schmid, Lena & Renner, Laura, 2020. "The Decision to Flee: Analyzing Gender-Specific Determinants of International Refugee Migration," VfS Annual Conference 2020 (Virtual Conference): Gender Economics 224596, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    23. Klaus Nowotny, 2015. "Institutions and the Location Decisions of Highly Skilled Migrants to Europe. WWWforEurope Working Paper No. 78," WIFO Studies, WIFO, number 57885, November.
    24. Cirillo, Marinella & Cattaneo, Andrea & Miller, Meghan & Sadiddin, Ahmad, 2022. "Establishing the link between internal and international migration: Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 157(C).
    25. Carola Méndez Araya & Marcelo Lufin Varas, 2013. "¿Dónde están los inmigrantes en Chile?: Un análisis de Patrones Espaciales de Residencia por Municipalidades," Documentos de Trabajo en Economia y Ciencia Regional 38, Universidad Catolica del Norte, Chile, Department of Economics, revised Mar 2013.
    26. Naghsh Nejad, Maryam, 2013. "Institutionalized Inequality and Brain Drain: An Empirical Study of the Effects of Women's Rights on the Gender Gap in High-Skilled Migration," IZA Discussion Papers 7864, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    27. Kuhnt, Jana, 2019. "Literature review: drivers of migration. Why do people leave their homes? Is there an easy answer? A structured overview of migratory determinants," IDOS Discussion Papers 9/2019, German Institute of Development and Sustainability (IDOS).
    28. Klöble, Katrin, 2021. "A behavioural perspective on the drivers of migration: Studying economic and social preferences using the Gallup World Poll," IDOS Discussion Papers 4/2021, German Institute of Development and Sustainability (IDOS).
    29. Falco Chiara & Rotondi Valentina, 2016. "Political Islam, Internet Use and Willingness to Migrate: Evidence from the Arab Barometer," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 22(1), pages 73-95, January.
    30. Chernina Eugenia M., 2020. "The Role of Migration Experience in Migrants’ Destination Choice," IZA Journal of Development and Migration, Sciendo & Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 11(1), pages 1-29, January.

  6. Michel Beine & Sara Salomone, 2010. "Migration and Networks: Does Education Matter more than Gender?," CESifo Working Paper Series 3010, CESifo.

    Cited by:

    1. Michel Beine & Sara Salomone, 2011. "Network Effects in International Migration: Education versus Gender," DEM Discussion Paper Series 11-08, Department of Economics at the University of Luxembourg.

Articles

  1. Ruyssen, Ilse & Salomone, Sara, 2018. "Female migration: A way out of discrimination?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 224-241.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Maëlan Le Goff & Sara Salomone, 2016. "Remittances and the Changing Composition of Migration," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 39(4), pages 513-529, April.

    Cited by:

    1. Bredtmann, Julia & Martínez Flores, Fernanda & Otten, Sebastian, 2018. "Remittances and the Brain Drain: Evidence from Microdata for Sub-Saharan Africa," EconStor Open Access Articles and Book Chapters, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 1-22.
    2. Giacomo Oddo & Maurizio Magnani & Riccardo Settimo & Simonetta Zappa, 2016. "Remittances of foreign workers in Italy: an estimation of invisible flows in the "informal channel"," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 332, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.

  3. Michel Beine & Sara Salomone, 2013. "Network Effects in International Migration: Education versus Gender," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 115(2), pages 354-380, April.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Docquier, Frédéric & Marfouk, Abdeslam & Salomone, Sara & Sekkat, Khalid, 2012. "Are Skilled Women More Migratory than Skilled Men?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 251-265.

    Cited by:

    1. Thierry Baudassé & Rémi Bazillier, 2014. "Gender inequality and emigration: Push factor or selection process?," International Economics, CEPII research center, issue 139, pages 19-47.
    2. Edoardo FERRUCCI & Francesco LISSONI & Ernest MIGUELEZ, 2020. "Coming from afar and picking a man’s job:Women immigrant inventors in the United States," Bordeaux Economics Working Papers 2020-01, Bordeaux School of Economics (BSE).
    3. Ilse Ruyssen & Sara Salomone, 2015. "Female Migration: A Way out of Discrimination?," CESifo Working Paper Series 5572, CESifo.
    4. Neumayer, Eric & Plumper, Thomas, 2021. "Women’s economic rights in developing countries and the gender gap in migration to Germany," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 112557, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    5. Raul Ramos, 2019. "Migration aspirations among youth in the Middle East and North Africa region," Journal of Geographical Systems, Springer, vol. 21(4), pages 487-507, December.
    6. Chiara Falco, 2015. "Education and migration: empirical evidence from Ecuador," Working Papers 297, University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics, revised Mar 2015.
    7. Winters, John V., 2015. "Do Earnings by College Major Affect Graduate Migration?," IZA Discussion Papers 9512, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    8. Miriam Manchin & Sultan Orazbayev, 2018. "Social Networks and the Intention to Migrate," CID Working Papers 90a, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    9. Chort, Isabelle, 2014. "Mexican Migrants to the US: What Do Unrealized Migration Intentions Tell Us About Gender Inequalities?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 535-552.
    10. Ruxanda Berlinschi & Ani Harutyunyan, 2016. "Do migrants think differently? Evidence from East European and post-Soviet states," Working Papers of Department of Economics, Leuven 551444, KU Leuven, Faculty of Economics and Business (FEB), Department of Economics, Leuven.
    11. Frédéric Docquier & Hillel Rapoport, 2012. "Globalization, Brain Drain, and Development," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 50(3), pages 681-730, September.
    12. Shakya, Shishir & Basnet, Subuna & Paudel, Jayash, 2022. "Natural disasters and labor migration: Evidence from Nepal’s earthquake," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 151(C).
    13. Xu Xu & Kevin Sylwester, 2016. "Environmental Quality and International Migration," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 69(1), pages 157-180, February.
    14. Maryam Naghsh Nejad & Andrew T. Young, 2014. "Female Brain Drains and Women's Rights Gaps : A Gravity Model Analysis of Bilateral Migration Flows," Working Papers 14-10, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    15. Elveren, Adem Yavuz & Toksöz, Gülay, 2017. "Why Don’t Highly Skilled Women Want to Return? Turkey’s Brain Drain from a Gender Perspective," MPRA Paper 80290, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Schmid, Lena & Renner, Laura, 2020. "The Decision to Flee: Analyzing Gender-Specific Determinants of International Refugee Migration," VfS Annual Conference 2020 (Virtual Conference): Gender Economics 224596, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    17. Michel Beine & Sara Salomone, 2010. "Migration and Networks: Does Education Matter more than Gender?," CESifo Working Paper Series 3010, CESifo.
    18. Naghsh Nejad, Maryam, 2013. "Institutionalized Inequality and Brain Drain: An Empirical Study of the Effects of Women's Rights on the Gender Gap in High-Skilled Migration," IZA Discussion Papers 7864, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    19. Sandra Pellet & Marine de Talancé, 2021. "Is there a gender gap in health among migrants in Russia?," Erudite Working Paper 2021-11, Erudite.
    20. Xu, Xu & Sylwester, Kevin, 2016. "The effects of foreign direct investment on emigration: The roles of FDI source country, education, and gender," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 401-409.
    21. Edo, Anthony & Toubal, Farid, 2017. "Immigration and the gender wage gap," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 196-214.
    22. Thierry Baudassé & Rémi Bazillier, 2011. "Gender Discrimination and Emigration: Push Factor Versus Screening Process Hypothesis," Working Papers halshs-00829499, HAL.

  5. Docquier, Frédéric & Rapoport, Hillel & Salomone, Sara, 2012. "Remittances, migrants' education and immigration policy: Theory and evidence from bilateral data," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(5), pages 817-828.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 5 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-MIG: Economics of Human Migration (4) 2011-07-13 2011-11-07 2015-07-04 2015-09-26
  2. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (3) 2011-07-13 2015-07-04 2015-09-26
  3. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (3) 2011-07-13 2011-11-07 2011-11-28
  4. NEP-INT: International Trade (2) 2015-07-04 2015-09-26
  5. NEP-DEV: Development (1) 2015-07-04
  6. NEP-HRM: Human Capital & Human Resource Management (1) 2011-07-13
  7. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (1) 2015-07-04

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