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Are skilled women more migratory than skilled men?

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  • Frederic DOCQUIER

    (UNIVERSITE CATHOLIQUE DE LOUVAIN, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES) and FNRS)

  • Abdeslam MARFOUK

    (UNIVERSITE LIBRE DE BRUXELLES)

  • Sara SALOMONE

    (UNIVERSITE CATHOLIQUE DE LOUVAIN, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES) and TOR VERGATA UNIVERSITY)

  • Khalid SEKKAT

    (UNIVERSITE LIBRE DE BRUXELLES)

Abstract

This paper empirically studies emigration patterns of skilled males and females. In the most relevant model accounting for interdependencies between women and men’s decisions, we derive the gendered responses to traditional push factors. Females and males do not respond with the same intensity to the traditional determinants of labor mobility and gender-specific characteristics of the population at origin. Moreover, being other factors equal, the female willingness to follow the spouse seems to be much more pronounced with respect to the male one. From a quantitative perspective, our model reveals that skilled women are not more migratory than skilled men internationally, thus rejecting the existence of a genetic or social gender gap in international skilled migration.

Suggested Citation

  • Frederic DOCQUIER & Abdeslam MARFOUK & Sara SALOMONE & Khalid SEKKAT, 2009. "Are skilled women more migratory than skilled men?," LIDAM Discussion Papers IRES 2009021, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
  • Handle: RePEc:ctl:louvir:2009021
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    File URL: http://sites.uclouvain.be/econ/DP/IRES/2009021.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Michel Beine & Sara Salomone, 2010. "Migration and Networks: Does Education Matter more than Gender?," CESifo Working Paper Series 3010, CESifo.
    2. Thierry Baudassé & Rémi Bazillier, 2014. "Gender inequality and emigration: Push factor or selection process?," International Economics, CEPII research center, issue 139, pages 19-47.
    3. Edo, Anthony & Toubal, Farid, 2017. "Immigration and the gender wage gap," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 196-214.
    4. Naghsh Nejad, Maryam, 2013. "Institutionalized Inequality and Brain Drain: An Empirical Study of the Effects of Women's Rights on the Gender Gap in High-Skilled Migration," IZA Discussion Papers 7864, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Frédéric Docquier & Hillel Rapoport, 2012. "Globalization, Brain Drain, and Development," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 50(3), pages 681-730, September.
    6. Thierry Baudassé & Rémi Bazillier, 2011. "Gender Discrimination and Emigration: Push Factor Versus Screening Process Hypothesis," Working Papers halshs-00829499, HAL.

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