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A Global Assessment of Human Capital Mobility: the Role of non-OECD Destinations

Listed author(s):
  • Frédéric DOCQUIER

    ()

    (UNIVERSITE CATHOLIQUE DE LOUVAIN, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES) and FNRS)

  • Çağlar ÖZDEN

    ()

    (World Bank)

  • Christopher PARSONS

    ()

    (University of Oxford)

  • Ehran ARTUC

    ()

    (World Bank)

The discourse concerning the mobility of human capital internationally typically evokes migratory patterns from poorer to relatively more wealthy countries and this focus is strongly reflected in the (brain drain) literature. This emphasis omits an important and as yet understudied aspect of the phenomena however, namely skill transfer to non-OECD and in particular, emerging nations. This paper contributes to the literature by first developing a new dataset of international bilateral migration stocks by gender and education level, which includes both OECD and non-OECD countries as destinations in 1990 and 2000. We then use pseudo-gravity model regressions to impute missing values where data are unavailable, such that we are able to provide, for the first time, a global assessment of human capital mobility. The comprehensiveness of the resulting matrices facilitates a more nuanced definition of emigration rates based on the concept of the natural labour force, which additionally considers both entries and exits of workers.

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File URL: http://sites.uclouvain.be/econ/DP/IRES/2012022.pdf
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Paper provided by Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES) in its series Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) with number 2012022.

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Length: 45
Date of creation: 30 Sep 2012
Handle: RePEc:ctl:louvir:2012022
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