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Networks and migrants’ intended destination

Author

Listed:
  • Simone Bertoli

    (CERDI - Centre d'Études et de Recherches sur le Développement International - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - UCA [2017-2020] - Université Clermont Auvergne [2017-2020])

  • Ilse Ruyssen

    (UCL - Université Catholique de Louvain)

Abstract

Social networks are known to influence migration decisions, but connections between individuals remain usually unobserved. Surveys conducted by Gallup in 147 countries provide information on migration intentions and on distance-one connections in each destination. The distribution of distance-one connections mirrors the one of migrant stocks, and intentions are informative about actual decisions. The estimation of originspecific conditional logit models reveals that distance-one connections can alter the ranking of most pairs of destinations. We test the validity of the distributional assumptions that underlie identification and perform extensive robustness checks, thus mitigating the concerns about the threats to identification posed by unobservables.

Suggested Citation

  • Simone Bertoli & Ilse Ruyssen, 2018. "Networks and migrants’ intended destination," Post-Print hal-01798143, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:hal-01798143
    DOI: 10.1093/jeg/lby012
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01798143
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    International migration; migration intentions; Gallup World Polls;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration

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