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Does talent migration increase inequality? A quantitative assessment in football labour market

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  • Vasilakis, Chrysovalantis

Abstract

I analyze the links between talent migration and cross-country inequality by exploiting the 1995 elimination of mobility restrictions on the European football labor market. I develop a simple model and employ an empirical dataset to estimate its parameters. Through simulation analysis, I compare actual data with a counterfactual no-mobility restriction trajectory, and conclude that the elimination of mobility barriers increases not only cross-country inequality by 25%, but also global output in the football economy by stimulating the production of new talent in Africa, Latin and Central America.

Suggested Citation

  • Vasilakis, Chrysovalantis, 2017. "Does talent migration increase inequality? A quantitative assessment in football labour market," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 150-166.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:dyncon:v:85:y:2017:i:c:p:150-166
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jedc.2017.10.003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    International migration; Brain drain; Free mobility; Inequality; European football;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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