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Heterogeneity in migration network effects across cultures

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  • Bogatzki, Tamara

Abstract

I empirically assess the importance of socially interdependent origin cultures as opposed to socially independent ones for network effects in inter-national migration. I propose that societies that emphasise collectivist behaviour accumulate larger levels of communityspecific social capital than individualist societies. Furthermore, while community-specific social capital makes migration away from the group costly it can be recovered by entering a corresponding network abroad. My estimates show consistent positive effects of social interdependence on the importance of migrant diasporas for bilateral emigration rates from all over the world to 30 OECD destinations across a plethora of specifications. For people from an origin with maximal emphasis on collectivism the network effect can be up to more than twice as large as for people from the individualist pole of the scale. The pattern is reflected when comparing trust in other people across different degrees of generalisation, suggesting that the heterogeneous diaspora effect may indeed be driven by higher ingroup-specific social capital in collectivist cultures.

Suggested Citation

  • Bogatzki, Tamara, 2021. "Heterogeneity in migration network effects across cultures," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Migration, Integration, Transnationalization SP VI 2021-102, WZB Berlin Social Science Center.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:wzbmit:spvi2021102
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    International Migration; Cultural Economics; Economic Sociology; Collectivism; Individualism; Migration Networks; Social Capital; Internationale Migration; Kulturökonomik; Wirtschaftsökonomik; Kollektivismus; Individualismus; Migrationsnetzwerke; Sozialkapital;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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