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Remittances and the human capital of children: New evidence from Kyrgyzstan during revolution and financial crisis, 2005–2009

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  • Kroeger, Antje
  • Anderson, Kathryn H.

Abstract

We analyze the effect of the receipt of remittances on the education and health of children in Kyrgyzstan during a volatile period of their recent history, 2005–2009. The country experienced revolution in 2005 and the global financial crisis beginning in 2008. Both events impact human capital investment, and the changes vary by region of the country. We use fixed effects estimation and fixed effects, instrumental variables estimation to isolate the effects of remittances and other events on human capital. We find that boys aged 14–18 in remittances’ receiving households are less likely to be enrolled in school than other children. We also find that girls in remittances’ receiving households are more likely to be malnourished (thin). Both effects are relatively small. Remittances do not improve the human capital of children left behind. However, we do find an overall positive improvement in school enrollment among young children between 2005 and 2009 but a negative trend in enrollment among older boys and girls. Nutrition improves over time. Regional differences are apparent in these trends in nutrition and education.

Suggested Citation

  • Kroeger, Antje & Anderson, Kathryn H., 2014. "Remittances and the human capital of children: New evidence from Kyrgyzstan during revolution and financial crisis, 2005–2009," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 770-785.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jcecon:v:42:y:2014:i:3:p:770-785
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jce.2013.06.001
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    Cited by:

    1. Ivlevs, Artjoms & Nikolova, Milena & Graham, Carol Lee, 2018. "Emigration, Remittances and the Subjective Well-Being of Those Staying Behind," IZA Discussion Papers 11437, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Barbara Dietz & Kseniia Gatskova & Artjoms Ivlevs, 2015. "Emigration, Remittances and the Education of Children Staying Behind: Evidence from Tajikistan," Working Papers 354, Leibniz Institut für Ost- und Südosteuropaforschung (Institute for East and Southeast European Studies).
    3. repec:rfh:bbejor:v:6:y:2017:i:2:p:74-91 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:pid:journl:v:55:y:2016:i:2:p:123-149 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Lucia Mangiavacchi, 2016. "Family structure and children’s educational attainment in transition economies," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 303-303, October.
    6. Cebotari, Victor & Siegel, Melissa & Mazzucato, Valentina, 2016. "Migration and the education of children who stay behind in Moldova and Georgia," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 96-107.
    7. Kseniia Gatskova & Artjoms Ivlevs & Barbara Dietz, 2017. "Does migration affect education of girls and young women in Tajikistan?," WIDER Working Paper Series 104, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Remittances; Education; Nutrition; Central Asia; Kyrgyzstan;

    JEL classification:

    • I - Health, Education, and Welfare
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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