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Immigration, Family Responsibilities and the Labor Supply of Skilled Native Women

Author

Listed:
  • Farré Lidia

    () (Institut d’Anàlisi Econòmica (CSIC))

  • González Libertad

    () (Universitat Pompeu Fabra)

  • Ortega Francesc

    () (Queen’s College - CUNY)

Abstract

We investigate the effect of immigration on the labor supply of skilled women, using data on Spain’s large recent immigration wave. We adopt a spatial correlations approach and instrument for current immigration using ethnic networks. We find that female immigration increases the local availability of household services and reduces their price. It also increases the labor supply of skilled native women, by allowing them to return to work earlier after childbirth, and to continue working while caring for elderly dependents. Immigration can account for one third of the recent increase in the employment rate of college-educated women providing child or elderly care.

Suggested Citation

  • Farré Lidia & González Libertad & Ortega Francesc, 2011. "Immigration, Family Responsibilities and the Labor Supply of Skilled Native Women," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 11(1), pages 1-48, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:bejeap:v:11:y:2011:i:1:n:34
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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