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Migration, remittances and poverty in Ecuador

  • Francesca MARCHETTA

    ()

    (Université d'Auvergne)

  • Simone BERTOLI

    (Centre d'Etudes et de Recherches sur le Développement International)

We analyse the influence of the recent wave of migration on the incidence of poverty among stayers in Ecuador. We draw our data from a survey that provides detailed information on migrants. The analysis reveals a significant negative effect of migration on poverty among migrant households. This effect is substantially smaller than the one that we find focusing on recipient households. We explore the factors that account for this divergence. Our analysis entails that the existing empirical evidence on the relationship between remittances and poverty needs not to be informative about the size of the direct poverty-reduction potential of migration.

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Paper provided by CERDI in its series Working Papers with number 201407.

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Length: 41
Date of creation: 2014
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cdi:wpaper:1545
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