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Remittances and Labor Force Participation in Mexico: An Analysis Using Propensity Score Matching


  • Cox-Edwards, Alejandra
  • Rodríguez-Oreggia, Eduardo


Summary About 2.5 million Mexicans migrated to the United States during 1997-2002, and 1.6 million of them sent remittances to their families. Did recipients change their labor force status in response to these remittances? This question has been examined before. Unlike the previous studies, we separate persistent from sporadic remittances, and we use propensity score matching to measure differences in behavior. We find limited evidence of labor force participation effects of persistent remittances, which is broadly consistent with remittances being an integral part of household's income generation strategy.

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  • Cox-Edwards, Alejandra & Rodríguez-Oreggia, Eduardo, 2009. "Remittances and Labor Force Participation in Mexico: An Analysis Using Propensity Score Matching," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(5), pages 1004-1014, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:37:y:2009:i:5:p:1004-1014

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Fatma MABROUK & Jacob ODUOR & Abebe SHIMELES, 2015. "Remittances and Youth Labor Market Participation in Africa," Cahiers du GREThA 2015-32, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée.
    2. Marjan Petreski & Nikica Mojsoska-Blazevski & Maja Ristovska & Edi Smokvarski, 2014. "Youth Self-Employment in Households Receiving Remittances in Macedonia," Working Papers PMMA 2014-08, PEP-PMMA.
    3. Murard, Elie, 2016. "Consumption and Leisure: The Welfare Impact of Migration on Family Left Behind," IZA Discussion Papers 10305, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Simone Bertoli & Francesca Marchetta, 2014. "Migration, Remittances and Poverty in Ecuador," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(8), pages 1067-1089, August.
    5. Göbel, Kristin, 2012. "Remittances and Gender-Speci fic Employment Patterns in Peru - a longitudinal Analysis," Annual Conference 2012 (Goettingen): New Approaches and Challenges for the Labor Market of the 21st Century 65409, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    6. Konte M., 2014. "Do remittances not promote growth? : a bias-adjusted three-step mixture-of-regressions," MERIT Working Papers 075, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    7. Jean-Louis COMBES & Christian EBEKE & Mathilde MAUREL, 2011. "Remittances and the Prevalence of Working Poor," Working Papers 201109, CERDI.
    8. López-Videla, Bruno & Machuca, Carlos Emilio, 2014. "The Effects of Remittances on Poverty at the Household Level in Bolivia: A Propensity Score Matching Approach," MPRA Paper 55201, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Luis Arango & Dolores Mata & Nataly Obando, 2015. "Echoes of the crises in Spain and US in the Colombian labor market: a differences-in-differences approach," SERIEs: Journal of the Spanish Economic Association, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 6(4), pages 441-477, November.
    10. Michael Clemens and David McKenzie, 2014. "Why Don't Remittances Appear to Affect Growth? - Working Paper 366," Working Papers 366, Center for Global Development.
    11. Nandi, Tushar Kanti & Kar, Saibal, 2015. "Short-term Migration and Intergenerational Persistence of Industry in Rural India," IZA Discussion Papers 9283, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. Makrame Gaaliche & Montassar Zayati Gaaliche, 2014. "The causal relationship between remittances and poverty reduction in developing country: using a non-stationary dynamic panel data," Economic Analysis Working Papers (2002-2010). Atlantic Review of Economics (2011-2016), Colexio de Economistas de A Coruña, Spain and Fundación Una Galicia Moderna, vol. 1, pages 1-1, June.
    13. Leonardo Bonilla Mejía, 2016. "Choques externos y remesas internacionales en las regiones de Colombia," Documentos de trabajo sobre Economía Regional y Urbana 250, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
    14. Delphine Boutin, 2011. "Envoi de fonds et allocation du temps des enfants au Niger : L'effet indirect des chocs négatifs," Working Papers hal-00637607, HAL.
    15. Christian Ebeke & Thierry Yogo Urbain, 2013. "Working Paper 185 - Remittances and the Voter Turnout in Sub-Saharan Africa: Evidence from Macro and Micro Level Data," Working Paper Series 989, African Development Bank.
    16. Andersson, L., 2014. "Migration, remittances and household welfare in Ethiopia," MERIT Working Papers 004, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    17. Aomar Ibourk & Jabrane Amaghouss, 2014. "Impact of Migrant Remittances on Economic Empowerment of Women: A Macroeconomic Investigation," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 4(3), pages 597-611.
    18. Mohammad Reza Farzanegan & Sherif Maher Hassan & Ribal Abi Raad, 2017. "Causes and Impacts of Remittances: Household Survey Evidence from Egypt," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201737, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
    19. Orrenius, Pia M. & Zavodny, Madeline & Cañas, Jesús & Coronado, Roberto, 2010. "Do remittances boost economic development? Evidence from Mexican states," Working Papers 1007, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
    20. Michael Clemens and Timothy N. Ogden, 2014. "Migration as a Strategy for Household Finance: A Research Agenda on Remittances, Payments, and Development- Working Paper 354," Working Papers 354, Center for Global Development.


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