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Remittances and Poverty Linkages in Pakistan: Evidence and Some Suggestions for Further Analysis

Author

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  • Mohammad Irfan

    (Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, Islamabad.)

Abstract

Global remittances experienced a dramatic increase over the years, particularly since 1990 wherein the developing world emerged to be the major beneficiary accounting for 60 percent of the total amount. Because of the sheer volume, and magnitude of the remittances, and pre-eminence of these flows compared to the FDIs, development assistance and in some cases the trade related transactions, the development practitioners tended to focus and investigate the importance of remittances which are generally regarded as a dependable source for growth, improved welfare and poverty alleviation in the developing world. Given the fact that remittances flows entail wide ranging ramifications both for sending as well as receiving countries, difficult to be generalised, hence empirical evidence has been mounted though lack of consensus is visible.

Suggested Citation

  • Mohammad Irfan, 2011. "Remittances and Poverty Linkages in Pakistan: Evidence and Some Suggestions for Further Analysis," PIDE-Working Papers 2011:78, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:pid:wpaper:2011:78
    as

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    File URL: http://www.pide.org.pk/pdf/Working%20Paper/WorkingPaper-78.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Rizwana Siddiqui & A. R. Kemal, 2006. "Remittances, Trade Liberalisation, and Poverty in Pakistan: The Role of Excluded Variables in Poverty Change Analysis," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 45(3), pages 383-415.
    2. Adams, Richard Jr. & Page, John, 2005. "Do international migration and remittances reduce poverty in developing countries?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(10), pages 1645-1669, October.
    3. Ralph Chami & Connel Fullenkamp & Samir Jahjah, 2005. "Are Immigrant Remittance Flows a Source of Capital for Development?," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 52(1), pages 55-81, April.
    4. Qayyum, Abdul & Javid, Muhammad & Arif, Umaima, 2008. "Impact of Remittances on Economic Growth and Poverty: Evidence from Pakistan," MPRA Paper 22941, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. G. M. Arif, 1999. "Remittances and Investments at the Household Level in Pakistan," PIDE-Working Papers 1999:166, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics.
    6. Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina & Pozo, Susan, 2004. "Workers' Remittances and the Real Exchange Rate: A Paradox of Gifts," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(8), pages 1407-1417, August.
    7. Rashid Amjad, 1986. "Impact of Workers' Remittances from the Middle East on Pakistan's Economy: Some Selected Issues," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 25(4), pages 757-785.
    8. Acosta, Pablo & Calderon, Cesar & Fajnzylber, Pablo & Lopez, Humberto, 2008. "What is the Impact of International Remittances on Poverty and Inequality in Latin America?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 89-114, January.
    9. Rashid Amjad & A.R. Kemal, 1997. "Macroeconomic Policies and their Impact on Poverty Alleviation in Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 36(1), pages 39-68.
    10. Michael T. Gapen & Ralph Chami & Peter J Montiel & Adolfo Barajas & Connel Fullenkamp, 2009. "Do Workers’ Remittances Promote Economic Growth?," IMF Working Papers 09/153, International Monetary Fund.
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    Cited by:

    1. Atiq Rehman, 2017. "Remittances for Growth: Initiatives for Remitters and Remittances," Working Papers id:12183, eSocialSciences.
    2. Michael Clemens and David McKenzie, 2014. "Why Don't Remittances Appear to Affect Growth? - Working Paper 366," Working Papers 366, Center for Global Development.
    3. Rashid Amjad & G. M. Arif & M. Irfan, 2012. "Preliminary Study: Explaining the Ten-fold Increase in Remittances to Pakistan 2001-2012," PIDE-Working Papers 2012:86, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics.
    4. Clemens, Michael A. & McKenzie, David, 2014. "Why don't remittances appear to affect growth ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6856, The World Bank.

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