IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/jda/journl/vol.49year2015issue1pp207-221.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The relationship between economic growth and remittances in the presence of cross-sectional dependence

Author

Listed:
  • Mohammad Salahuddin

    () (University of Southern Queensland, Australia)

  • Jeff Gow

    (University of Southern Queensland, Australia
    Stellenbosch University, South Africa)

Abstract

This paper reexamines the relationship between migrant remittances and economic growth using the most recent panel data (1977-2012) for some of the largest recipient countries of foreign remittances in the world namely, Bangladesh, India, Pakistan and the Philippines. A cross-sectional dependence test (CD) was employed which confirms the presence of cross sectional dependence in the panel. We employ CIPS panel unit root test that accounts for cross sectional dependence to test the stationarity of data. The long run relationship between economic growth and remittance was confirmed by the Panel Pedroni and Westerlund cointegration tests. Then, the Pooled Mean Group (PMG) regression technique was applied to estimate the short- and the long-run relationship between the two variables while controlling for country size and heterogeneity. The results indicate a highly significant long-run positive relationship between remittance and economic growth in these countries. However, there is an insignificant positive association between them in the short run. The error correction term in the short run is -0.037 suggesting that approximately 3% of the deviations in the short run from the long-run equilibrium are corrected each year. The overall results support the argument that remittances are playing increasingly important role for these countries' economies and as such, they should continue with their pro-remittance policies looking combined with diversifying their manpower exports. Although, the findings are consistent with most of the existing literature that support the positive role of migrants' remittances in spurring economic growth, scope exists for future research to identify various channels through which remittances impact not only growth but also other macro variables.

Suggested Citation

  • Mohammad Salahuddin & Jeff Gow, 2015. "The relationship between economic growth and remittances in the presence of cross-sectional dependence," Journal of Developing Areas, Tennessee State University, College of Business, vol. 49(1), pages 207-221, January-M.
  • Handle: RePEc:jda:journl:vol.49:year:2015:issue1:pp:207-221
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/journal_of_developing_areas/v049/49.1.salahuddin.html
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hiranya Nath & Khawaja A. Mamun, 2010. "Workers’ Migration and Remittances in Bangladesh," Working Papers 1002, Sam Houston State University, Department of Economics and International Business.
    2. Imai, Katsushi S. & Gaiha, Raghav & Ali, Abdilahi & Kaicker, Nidhi, 2014. "Remittances, growth and poverty: New evidence from Asian countries," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 524-538.
    3. Adams, Richard Jr. & Page, John, 2005. "Do international migration and remittances reduce poverty in developing countries?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(10), pages 1645-1669, October.
    4. Chowdhury, Mamta B., 2011. "Remittances flow and financial development in Bangladesh," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 2600-2608.
    5. Westerlund, Joakim & Edgerton, David L., 2007. "A panel bootstrap cointegration test," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 97(3), pages 185-190, December.
    6. Ziesemer, Thomas H.W., 2010. "The impact of the credit crisis on poor developing countries: Growth, worker remittances, accumulation and migration," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 1230-1245, September.
    7. M. Hashem Pesaran, 2007. "A simple panel unit root test in the presence of cross-section dependence," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(2), pages 265-312.
    8. Pesaran, M. Hashem & Smith, Ron, 1995. "Estimating long-run relationships from dynamic heterogeneous panels," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 79-113, July.
    9. Ralph Chami & Connel Fullenkamp & Samir Jahjah, 2005. "Are Immigrant Remittance Flows a Source of Capital for Development?," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 52(1), pages 55-81, April.
    10. Combes, Jean-Louis & Ebeke, Christian, 2011. "Remittances and Household Consumption Instability in Developing Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(7), pages 1076-1089, July.
    11. Abu Siddique & E. A. Selvanathan & Saroja Selvanathan, 2011. "Remittances and Economic Growth: Empirical Evidence from Bangladesh, India and Sri Lanka," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(8), pages 1045-1062, October.
    12. Pesaran, M. Hashem & Vanessa Smith, L. & Yamagata, Takashi, 2013. "Panel unit root tests in the presence of a multifactor error structure," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 175(2), pages 94-115.
    13. Adams, Richard H. & Cuecuecha, Alfredo, 2013. "The Impact of Remittances on Investment and Poverty in Ghana," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 24-40.
    14. Rao, B. Bhaskara & Hassan, Gazi Mainul, 2011. "A panel data analysis of the growth effects of remittances," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(1-2), pages 701-709, January.
    15. Naiditch, Claire & Vranceanu, Radu, 2010. "Equilibrium migration with invested remittances: The EECA evidence," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 454-474, December.
    16. Anupam Das & Murshed Chowdhury, 2011. "Remittances and GDP Dynamics in 11 Developing Countries: Evidence from Panel Cointegration and PMG Techniques," Romanian Economic Journal, Department of International Business and Economics from the Academy of Economic Studies Bucharest, vol. 14(42), pages 3-23, December.
    17. Bugamelli, Matteo & Paternò, Francesco, 2009. "Do Workers' Remittances Reduce the Probability of Current Account Reversals?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 1821-1838, December.
    18. Gyan Pradhan & Mukti Upadhyay & Kamal Upadhyaya, 2008. "Remittances and economic growth in developing countries," The European Journal of Development Research, Taylor and Francis Journals, vol. 20(3), pages 497-506.
    19. Pedroni, Peter, 1999. " Critical Values for Cointegration Tests in Heterogeneous Panels with Multiple Regressors," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 61(0), pages 653-670, Special I.
    20. Catrinescu, Natalia & Leon-Ledesma, Miguel & Piracha, Matloob & Quillin, Bryce, 2009. "Remittances, Institutions, and Economic Growth," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 81-92, January.
    21. Kumar, Ronald Ravinesh, 2013. "Remittances and economic growth: A study of Guyana," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 462-472.
    22. Nyamongo, Esman Morekwa & Misati, Roseline N. & Kipyegon, Leonard & Ndirangu, Lydia, 2012. "Remittances, financial development and economic growth in Africa," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 64(3), pages 240-260.
    23. Michael T. Gapen & Ralph Chami & Peter J Montiel & Adolfo Barajas & Connel Fullenkamp, 2009. "Do Workers’ Remittances Promote Economic Growth?," IMF Working Papers 09/153, International Monetary Fund.
    24. Eckstein, Susan, 2010. "Remittances and Their Unintended Consequences in Cuba," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(7), pages 1047-1055, July.
    25. Deodat E. Adenutsi, 2011. "Financial development, international migrant remittances and endogenous growth in Ghana," Studies in Economics and Finance, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 28(1), pages 68-89, March.
    26. Gupta, Sanjeev & Pattillo, Catherine A. & Wagh, Smita, 2009. "Effect of Remittances on Poverty and Financial Development in Sub-Saharan Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 104-115, January.
    27. Ziesemer, Thomas H.W., 2012. "Worker remittances, migration, accumulation and growth in poor developing countries: Survey and analysis of direct and indirect effects," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 103-118.
    28. Biru Paul & Md. Uddin & Abdullah Noman, 2011. "Remittances and output in Bangladesh: an ARDL bounds testing approach to cointegration," International Review of Economics, Springer;Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS), vol. 58(2), pages 229-242, June.
    29. Bayangos, Veronica & Jansen, Karel, 2011. "Remittances and Competitiveness: The Case of the Philippines," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(10), pages 1834-1846.
    30. Hung-Ju Chen, 2009. "A Brain Gain Or A Brain Drain? Migration, Endogenous Fertility, And Human Capital Formation," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 47(4), pages 766-782, October.
    31. repec:dgr:unumer:2008063 is not listed on IDEAS
    32. Syud Amer Ahmed & Terrie L. Walmsley, 2009. "Gains from the Liberalization of Temporary Migration," South Asia Economic Journal, Institute of Policy Studies of Sri Lanka, vol. 10(1), pages 61-80, January.
    33. Qayyum, Abdul & Javid, Muhammad & Arif, Umaima, 2008. "Impact of Remittances on Economic Growth and Poverty: Evidence from Pakistan," MPRA Paper 22941, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    34. Guha, Puja, 2013. "Macroeconomic effects of international remittances: The case of developing economies," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 292-305.
    35. B. Bhaskara Rao & Gazi Mainul Hassan, 2012. "Are the Direct and Indirect Growth Effects of Remittances Significant?," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 35(3), pages 351-372, March.
    36. Sharma, Manohar & Zaman, Hassan, 2009. "Who migrates overseas and is it worth their while ? an assessment of household survey data from Bangladesh," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5018, The World Bank.
    37. Pesaran, M. Hashem & Shin, Yongcheol, 1996. "Cointegration and speed of convergence to equilibrium," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 71(1-2), pages 117-143.
    38. B. Bhaskara Rao & Gazi Mainul Hassan, 2012. "An analysis of the determinants of the long-run growth rate of Bangladesh," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(5), pages 565-580, February.
    39. Anupam Das, 2012. "Remittance Behavior of Migrants and its Macroeconomic Effects in Four Developing Countries," International Journal of Applied Behavioral Economics (IJABE), IGI Global, vol. 1(1), pages 41-59, January.
    40. Nelson, Charles R. & Plosser, Charles I., 1982. "Trends and random walks in macroeconmic time series : Some evidence and implications," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 139-162.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Kristina Matuzeviciute & Mindaugas Butkus, 2016. "Remittances, Development Level, and Long-Run Economic Growth," Economies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 4(4), pages 1-20, December.
    2. Mohammad A. H. PRADHAN & Gias Uddin KHAN, 2015. "Role of Remittance for Improving Quality of Life: Evidence from Bangladesh," Turkish Economic Review, KSP Journals, vol. 2(3), pages 160-168, September.
    3. Cornelia Serena, PASCA, 2016. "Monetary Remittance - Romania Case Study," Contemporary Economy Journal, Constantin Brancoveanu University, vol. 1(3), pages 50-59.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    cross-sectional dependence; economic growth; migrants’ remittances; PMG;

    JEL classification:

    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • F43 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Economic Growth of Open Economies

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:jda:journl:vol.49:year:2015:issue1:pp:207-221. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Abu N.M. Wahid) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/cbtnsus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.