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Remittances and GDP Dynamics in 11 Developing Countries: Evidence from Panel Cointegration and PMG Techniques


  • Anupam Das

    () (Department of Policy Studies, Mount Royal University)

  • Murshed Chowdhury

    () (Department of Economics, University of Manitoba)


Despite a plethora of research, the role of remittances on economic growth is yet to be understood. Is there any long run relationship between remittances and GDP? This paper contributes to the literature by answering this question for 11 top remittance-recipient developing countries. These countries are: Bangladesh, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Gambia, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Lesotho, Philippines, Senegal and Sri Lanka. Using recently developed econometric techniques, i.e., panel cointegration and pooled mean group (PMG) approach; our results support a positive long run relationship between remittances and GDP. However, the magnitude of the remittance-GDP coefficient is rather quite small. We hypothesize that remittances may be used to increase consumption in these economies. Our results also imply that developing countries should formulate policies to divert this external resource into more productive sectors.

Suggested Citation

  • Anupam Das & Murshed Chowdhury, 2011. "Remittances and GDP Dynamics in 11 Developing Countries: Evidence from Panel Cointegration and PMG Techniques," Romanian Economic Journal, Department of International Business and Economics from the Academy of Economic Studies Bucharest, vol. 14(42), pages 3-23, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:rej:journl:v:14:y:2011:i:42:p:3-23

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. John Page & Sonia Plaza, 2006. "Migration Remittances and Development: A Review of Global Evidence," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 15(2), pages 245-336, December.
    2. Aysit Tansel & Pinar Yasar, 2010. "Macroeconomic impact of remittances on output growth: Evidence from Turkey," Migration Letters, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 7(2), pages 132-143, October.
    3. Bassanini, Andrea & Scarpetta, Stefano, 2002. "Does human capital matter for growth in OECD countries? A pooled mean-group approach," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 74(3), pages 399-405, February.
    4. Ralph Chami & Connel Fullenkamp & Samir Jahjah, 2005. "Are Immigrant Remittance Flows a Source of Capital for Development?," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 52(1), pages 55-81, April.
    5. Giuliano, Paola & Ruiz-Arranz, Marta, 2009. "Remittances, financial development, and growth," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(1), pages 144-152, September.
    6. Ziesemer Thomas H.W., 2009. "Worker Remittances and Growth: The Physical and Human Capital Channels," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 229(6), pages 743-773, December.
    7. Im, Kyung So & Pesaran, M. Hashem & Shin, Yongcheol, 2003. "Testing for unit roots in heterogeneous panels," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 115(1), pages 53-74, July.
    8. Asteriou, Dimitrios, 2009. "Foreign aid and economic growth: New evidence from a panel data approach for five South Asian countries," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 155-161.
    9. Catrinescu, Natalia & Leon-Ledesma, Miguel & Piracha, Matloob & Quillin, Bryce, 2009. "Remittances, Institutions, and Economic Growth," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 81-92, January.
    10. Biru Paul & Md. Uddin & Abdullah Noman, 2011. "Remittances and output in Bangladesh: an ARDL bounds testing approach to cointegration," International Review of Economics, Springer;Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS), vol. 58(2), pages 229-242, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Syed Tehseen Jawaid & Syed Ali Raza, 2012. "Workers' remittances and economic growth in China and Korea: an empirical analysis," Journal of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 5(3), pages 185-193, September.
    2. Mohammad Salahuddin & Jeff Gow, 2015. "The relationship between economic growth and remittances in the presence of cross-sectional dependence," Journal of Developing Areas, Tennessee State University, College of Business, vol. 49(1), pages 207-221, January-M.
    3. Jawaid, Syed Tehseen & Raza, Syed Ali, 2012. "Workers’ Remittances and Economic Growth in South Asia," MPRA Paper 39001, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item


    External resources; economic growth; investment; consumption; long run;

    JEL classification:

    • F24 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Remittances
    • F43 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Economic Growth of Open Economies
    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models


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