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Do Remittances Facilitate a Sustainable Current Account?

We examine how workers’ remittances impact on the current account. In doing so, we focus on how remittances affect the sustainability rather than size of current account balances. We find that the presence of remittances make it more likely that exports and imports are cointegrated thereby lending support to weak sustainability where increased remittances are associated with a faster speed of current account adjustment (lower persistence), particularly for those countries characterised by already highly persistent current account balances. We find that remittances are beneficial to the current account balance. This is in contrast to a literature that emphasises an adverse Dutch disease impact of workers’ remittances on the real exchange rate in terms of reduced external competitiveness.

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File URL: ftp://mngt.waikato.ac.nz/RePEc/wai/econwp/1407.pdf
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Paper provided by University of Waikato, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers in Economics with number 14/07.

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Length: 21 pages
Date of creation: 30 Jun 2014
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wai:econwp:14/07
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  1. Pedroni, Peter, 2004. "Panel Cointegration: Asymptotic And Finite Sample Properties Of Pooled Time Series Tests With An Application To The Ppp Hypothesis," Econometric Theory, Cambridge University Press, vol. 20(03), pages 597-625, June.
  2. Abu Siddique & E A Selvanathan & Saroja Selvanathan, 2010. "Remittances and Economic Growth: Empirical Evidence from Bangladesh India and Sri Lanka," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 10-27, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
  3. Emmanuel K.K. Lartey & Federico S. Mandelman & Pablo A. Acosta, 2008. "Remittances, exchange rate regimes, and the Dutch disease: a panel data analysis," Working Paper 2008-12, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  4. Westerlund, Joakim, 2005. "Testing for Error Correction in Panel Data," Working Papers 2005:11, Lund University, Department of Economics.
  5. Quintos, Carmela E, 1995. "Sustainability of the Deficit Process with Structural Shifts," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 13(4), pages 409-17, October.
  6. Rao, B. Bhaskara & Hassan, Gazi, 2009. "Are the Direct and Indirect Growth Effects of Remittances Significant?," MPRA Paper 18641, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  7. Matteo Bugamelli & Francesco Paternò, 2006. "Do Workers' Remittances Reduce the Probability of Current Account Reversals?," CEP Discussion Papers dp0714, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  8. Issiaka Coulibaly & Blaise Gnimassoun, 2013. "Current account sustainability in Sub-Saharan Africa: Does the exchange rate regime matter?," EconomiX Working Papers 2013-42, University of Paris West - Nanterre la Défense, EconomiX.
  9. Hassan, Gazi & Holmes, Mark, 2012. "Remittances and the real effective exchange rate," MPRA Paper 40084, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  10. Pesaran, M.H. & Smith, R., 1992. "Estimating Long-Run Relationships From Dynamic Heterogeneous Panels," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 9215, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
  11. Pablo A. Acosta & Emmanuel K.K. Lartey & Federico S. Mandelman, 2007. "Remittances and the Dutch disease," Working Paper 2007-08, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  12. Mark J. Holmes, 2006. "How Sustainable Are Oecd Current Account Balances In The Long Run?," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 74(5), pages 626-643, 09.
  13. Arize, Augustine C., 2002. "Imports and exports in 50 countries: Tests of cointegration and structural breaks," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 11(1), pages 101-115, April.
  14. Luigi Bonatti, 2006. "Unbalanced Growth and the Sustainability of the Current Account Deficit," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 14(5), pages 773-796, November.
  15. Marta Ruiz-Arranz & Paola Giuliano, 2005. "Remittances, Financial Development, and Growth," IMF Working Papers 05/234, International Monetary Fund.
  16. M. Hashem Pesaran, 2004. "Estimation and Inference in Large Heterogeneous Panels with a Multifactor Error Structure," CESifo Working Paper Series 1331, CESifo Group Munich.
  17. Lopez, Humberto & Molina, Luis & Bussolo, Maurizio, 2007. "Remittances and the real exchange rate," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4213, The World Bank.
  18. Maurice Obstfeld & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 1996. "Foundations of International Macroeconomics," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262150476, June.
  19. Menzie D. Chinn & Shang-Jin Wei, 2013. "A Faith-Based Initiative Meets the Evidence: Does a Flexible Exchange Rate Regime Really Facilitate Current Account Adjustment?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 95(1), pages 168-184, March.
  20. Mark J. Holmes & Jes�s Otero & Theodore Panagiotidis, 2010. "On the Stationarity of Current Account Deficits in the European Union," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18(4), pages 730-740, 09.
  21. Michael T. Gapen & Ralph Chami & Peter Montiel & Adolfo Barajas & Connel Fullenkamp, 2009. "Do Workers' Remittances Promote Economic Growth?," IMF Working Papers 09/153, International Monetary Fund.
  22. Gupta, Sanjeev & Pattillo, Catherine A. & Wagh, Smita, 2009. "Effect of Remittances on Poverty and Financial Development in Sub-Saharan Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 104-115, January.
  23. Dilip Ratha & Sanket Mohapatra & Ani Silwal, 2009. "Outlook for Remittance Flows 2009-2011 : Remittances Expected to Fall by 7-10 Percent in 2009," World Bank Other Operational Studies 10975, The World Bank.
  24. Ahmad Zubaidi Baharumshah & Evan Lau, 2002. "On the Sustainability of Current Account Deficits: Evidence from Four ASEAN Countries," Working Papers 0062, National University of Ireland Galway, Department of Economics, revised 2002.
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