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Through which channels can remittances spur economic growth in MENA countries?

  • Mim, Sami Ben
  • Ali, Mohamed Sami Ben
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    This paper studies the remittances' effect on economic growth. Using panel data techniques, the authors estimate several specifications to provide support of such relationship for MENA countries over the period 19802009. The findings provide new robust evidence on how remittances are used in MENA countries and detect the main channels which may interfere in this process. Estimation outcomes show that the most important part of remittances is consumed and that remittances stimulate growth only when they are invested. Moreover, empirical results suggest that remittances can enhance growth by encouraging human capital accumulation. Human capital is therefore an effective channel through which remittances stimulate growth in MENA countries.

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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.5018/economics-ejournal.ja.2012-33
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    File URL: http://econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/62006/1/722309473.pdf
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    Article provided by Kiel Institute for the World Economy in its journal Economics: The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal.

    Volume (Year): 6 (2012)
    Issue (Month): ()
    Pages: 1-27

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    Handle: RePEc:zbw:ifweej:201233
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