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What's different about monetary policy transmission in remittance-dependent countries?

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  • Barajas, Adolfo
  • Chami, Ralph
  • Ebeke, Christian
  • Oeking, Anne

Abstract

Despite welfare and poverty-reducing benefits for recipient households, remittance inflows have been shown to entail macroeconomic challenges; producing Dutch Disease-type effects, reducing the quality of institutions, delaying fiscal adjustment, and having an indeterminate effect on long-run growth. This paper explores an additional challenge, for monetary policy. Although remittances expand bank balance sheets, providing a stable flow of interest-insensitive funding, they tend to increase banks' holdings of liquid assets. This both reduces the need for an interbank market and severs the link between policy rate and banks’ marginal cost of funds, thus shutting down a major transmission channel. We develop a stylized model based on asymmetric information and a lack of transparent borrowers and undertake econometric analysis providing evidence that increased remittance inflows are associated with weaker transmission. As independent monetary policy becomes impaired, this result is consistent with earlier findings that recipient countries tend to favor fixed exchange rate regimes.

Suggested Citation

  • Barajas, Adolfo & Chami, Ralph & Ebeke, Christian & Oeking, Anne, 2018. "What's different about monetary policy transmission in remittance-dependent countries?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 134(C), pages 272-288.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:deveco:v:134:y:2018:i:c:p:272-288
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jdeveco.2018.05.013
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    Cited by:

    1. Immaculate Machasio & Peter Tillmann, 2016. "Remittance Infl ows and State-Dependent Monetary Policy Transmission in Developing Countries," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201638, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
    2. Machasio, Immaculate & Tillmann, Peter, 2017. "Remittance Inflows and State-Dependent Monetary Policy Transmission in Developing Countries," Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168137, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    3. Fromentin, Vincent & Leon, Florian, 2019. "Remittances and credit in developed and developing countries: A dynamic panel analysis," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 310-320.
    4. Abuka, Charles & Alinda, Ronnie K. & Minoiu, Camelia & Peydró, José-Luis & Presbitero, Andrea F., 2019. "Monetary policy and bank lending in developing countries: Loan applications, rates, and real effects," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 139(C), pages 185-202.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    worker's remittances; Monetary policy; Lending channel; Banking sector; Trilemma; E5; F24; O17; O23;

    JEL classification:

    • E5 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit
    • F24 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Remittances
    • O17 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Formal and Informal Sectors; Shadow Economy; Institutional Arrangements
    • O23 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Fiscal and Monetary Policy in Development

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