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Do Remittances Induce Inflation? Fresh Evidence from Developing Countries

Author

Listed:
  • Paresh Kumar Narayan

    () (School of Accounting, Economics and Finance, 70 Edgar Road, Burwood, 3125, Melbourne, Australia)

  • Seema Narayan

    () (School of Marketing, Economics and Finance, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Melbourne, Australia)

  • Sagarika Mishra

    () (School of Accounting, Economics and Finance, 70 Edgar Road, Burwood, 3125, Melbourne, Australia)

Abstract

The goal of this article is to examine the determinants of inflation in both the short run and the long run for 54 developing countries using a panel data set covering the 1995–2004 period. Apart from the commonly used economic determinants of inflation, we model the impact of remittances and institutional variables on inflation. Using the Arellano and Bond panel dynamic estimator and the Arellano and Bover and the Blundell and Bond system generalized method of moments estimator, we find evidence that in developing countries remittances generate inflation. The effect of remittances on inflation is more pronounced in the long run. Moreover, we find that openness, debt, current account deficits, the agricultural sector, and the short-term U.S. interest rate have a positive effect on inflation. We also find that improvements in democracy reduce inflation.

Suggested Citation

  • Paresh Kumar Narayan & Seema Narayan & Sagarika Mishra, 2011. "Do Remittances Induce Inflation? Fresh Evidence from Developing Countries," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 77(4), pages 914-933, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:sej:ancoec:v:77:4:y:2011:p:914-933
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.4284/0038-4038-77.4.914
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ghosh, Amit, 2014. "How do openness and exchange-rate regimes affect inflation?," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 190-202.
    2. Posso Alberto, 2015. "Remittances and financial institutions: is there a causal linkage?," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 15(2), pages 769-789, July.
    3. Ibarra, Raul & Trupkin, Danilo R., 2016. "Reexamining the relationship between inflation and growth: Do institutions matter in developing countries?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 52(PB), pages 332-351.
    4. repec:eee:quaeco:v:68:y:2018:i:c:p:254-265 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Satti, Saqlain Latif & Shahbaz, Muhammad & Mujahid, Nooreen & Ali, Amjad, 2013. "Impact of Financial Development and Globalization on Inflation: The Role of Remittance and Economic Growth in Bangladesh," MPRA Paper 51675, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 21 Nov 2013.
    6. Hathroubi, Salem & Aloui, Chaker, 2016. "On interactions between remittance outflows and Saudi Arabian macroeconomy: New evidence from wavelets," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 32-45.
    7. VACAFLORES, Diego E. & BECKWORTH, David, 2015. "Latin American Remittances Dependence On External Shocks," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 15(2), pages 115-128.
    8. Termos, Ali & Naufal, George & Genc, Ismail, 2013. "Remittance outflows and inflation: The case of the GCC countries," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 120(1), pages 45-47.
    9. VACAFLORES, Diego E & KISHAN, Ruby, 2014. "Remittances, International Reserves, And Exchange Rate Regimes In 9 Latin American Countries, 1997-2010," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 14(2).
    10. Randazzo, Teresa & Piracha, Matloob, 2014. "Remittances and Household Expenditure Behaviour in Senegal," IZA Discussion Papers 8106, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Adnan KHURSHID & Yin KEDONG & Adrian Cantemir CALIN & Oana Cristina POPOVICI, 2016. "Do Remittances Hurt Domestic Prices? New Evidence from Low, Lower-Middle and Middle–Income Groups," Journal for Economic Forecasting, Institute for Economic Forecasting, vol. 0(4), pages 95-114, December.
    12. Ibarra, Raul & Trupkin, Danilo R., 2016. "Reexamining the relationship between inflation and growth: Do institutions matter in developing countries?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 52(PB), pages 332-351.
    13. Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes & Susan Pozo, 2012. "Remittance Income Volatility and Labor Supply in Mexico," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 79(2), pages 257-276, October.
    14. Adolfo Barajas & Ralph Chami & Christian H Ebeke & Anne Oeking, 2016. "What’s Different about Monetary Policy Transmission in Remittance-Dependent Countries?," IMF Working Papers 16/44, International Monetary Fund.
    15. Williams, Kevin, 2017. "Do remittances improve political institutions? Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 65-75.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • E61 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Policy Objectives; Policy Designs and Consistency; Policy Coordination

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