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Moving Minds and Money: The Political Economy of Migrant Transfers

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  • Martina Metzger
  • Jennifer Pédussel Wu

Abstract

This paper examines the potential of digital financial services (Fintech) to increase the development impact of remittances. We discuss both household and macroeconomic perspectives of the nexus of digital financial services, remittances, and financial inclusion. Using our findings, we identify regulatory gaps in dealing with digital financial services to enhance the development impact of remittances. Political and social remittances, as well as collective remittances, and the role of diaspora networks are also considered. We then examine the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic before elucidating major research questions in the political economy of migrant transfers.

Suggested Citation

  • Martina Metzger & Jennifer Pédussel Wu, 2020. "Moving Minds and Money: The Political Economy of Migrant Transfers," ICDD Working Papers 33, University of Kassel, Fachbereich Gesellschaftswissenschaften (Social Sciences), Internatioanl Center for Development and Decent Work (ICDD).
  • Handle: RePEc:ajy:icddwp:33
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    File URL: https://kobra.uni-kassel.de/bitstream/handle/123456789/12370/ICDD_WP33_Metzger_Wu.pdf?sequence=5&isAllowed=y
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Catia Batista & Pedro C. Vicente, 2013. "Introducing Mobile Money in Rural Mozambique: Evidence from a Field Experiment," FEUNL Working Paper Series novafrica:wp1301, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Faculdade de Economia.
    2. Leo Van Hove & Antoine Dubus, 2019. "M-PESA and Financial Inclusion in Kenya: Of Paying Comes Saving?," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(3), pages 1-26, January.
    3. Stefan Staschen & Patrick Meagher, . "Basic Regulatory Enablers for Digital Financial Services," World Bank Other Operational Studies, The World Bank, number 30275, March.
    4. Barajas, Adolfo & Chami, Ralph & Ebeke, Christian & Oeking, Anne, 2018. "What's different about monetary policy transmission in remittance-dependent countries?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 134(C), pages 272-288.
    5. Mr. Sami Ben Naceur & Mohamed Trabelsi & Mr. Ralph Chami, 2020. "Do Remittances Enhance Financial Inclusion in LMICs and in Fragile States?," IMF Working Papers 2020/066, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Catia Batista & Pedro C. Vicente, 2013. "Introducing mobile money in rural Mozambique: Evidence from a field experiment," NOVAFRICA Working Paper Series wp1301, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Faculdade de Economia, NOVAFRICA.
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