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Symposium on the Monetary Transmission Mechanism

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  • Frederic S. Mishkin

Abstract

Understanding of monetary transmission mechanisms is crucial to answering a broad range of questions. These transmission mechanisms include interest-rate effects, exchange-rate effects, other asset price effects, and the so-called credit channel. This introduction to the symposium provides an overview of the main types of monetary transmission mechanisms found in the literature and a perspective on how the papers in the symposium relate to the overall literature and to each other.

Suggested Citation

  • Frederic S. Mishkin, 1995. "Symposium on the Monetary Transmission Mechanism," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(4), pages 3-10, Fall.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:jecper:v:9:y:1995:i:4:p:3-10
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/jep.9.4.3
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    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/jep.9.4.3
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mishkin, Frederic S., 1978. "The Household Balance Sheet and the Great Depression," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 38(4), pages 918-937, December.
    2. Tobin, James, 1969. "A General Equilibrium Approach to Monetary Theory," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 1(1), pages 15-29, February.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E50 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - General
    • E40 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - General

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