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A New Database of Health Professional Emigration from Africa

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  • Michael A. Clemens

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  • Gunilla Pettersson

Abstract

The migration of doctors and nurses from Africa to rich countries has raised fears of an African medical brain drain. But empirical research on the issue has been hampered by lack of data. How many doctors and nurses have left Africa? Which countries did they leave? Where have they settled? As part of a larger study of the consequences of the international migration of African health professionals, we compiled a database of the cumulative bilateral net flows of African-born physicians and nurses to the nine most important destination countries. It is the first database of net bilateral migration flows specific to a skilled profession collected systematically for a large number of developing countries. In this note we make these data available to the research community.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael A. Clemens & Gunilla Pettersson, 2006. "A New Database of Health Professional Emigration from Africa," Working Papers 95, Center for Global Development.
  • Handle: RePEc:cgd:wpaper:95
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    File URL: http://www.cgdev.org/content/publications/detail/9267
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    1. Marta Reynal-Querol, 2002. "Political systems, stability and civil wars," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(6), pages 465-483.
    2. Collier, Paul & Hoeffler, Anke, 1998. "On Economic Causes of Civil War," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 50(4), pages 563-573, October.
    3. Scheper-Hughes, Nancy, 1996. "Small wars and invisible genocides," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 43(5), pages 889-900, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Asongu Simplice, 2012. "Determinants of Health Professionals’ Migration in Africa," Working Papers 12/009, African Governance and Development Institute..
    2. Asongu Simplice, 2015. "Determinants of health professionals’ migration in Africa: a WHO based assessment," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 42(7), pages 666-686, July.
    3. Lucia Rizzica, 2008. "The Impact of Skilled Migration on the Sending Country: Evidence from African Medical Brain Drain," Rivista di Politica Economica, SIPI Spa, vol. 98(6), pages 195-230, November-.
    4. Docquier Frédéric & Rapoport Hillel, 2009. "Documenting the Brain Drain of “La Crème de la Crème”: Three Case-Studies on International Migration at the Upper Tail of the Education Distribution," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, pages 679-705.
    5. Connell, John & Zurn, Pascal & Stilwell, Barbara & Awases, Magda & Braichet, Jean-Marc, 2007. "Sub-Saharan Africa: Beyond the health worker migration crisis?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 64(9), pages 1876-1891, May.
    6. Frederic, DOCQUIER & B. Lindsay, LOWELL & Abdeslam, MARFOUK, 2007. "A gendered assessment of the brain drain," Discussion Papers (ECON - Département des Sciences Economiques) 2007045, Université catholique de Louvain, Département des Sciences Economiques.
    7. Driouchi, Ahmed & Boboc, Cristina & Zouag, Nada, 2009. "Emigration of Highly Skilled Labor: Determinants & Impacts," MPRA Paper 21567, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 23 Mar 2010.
    8. Asongu Simplice, 2014. "Globalization and health worker crisis: what do wealth-effects tell us?," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 41(12), pages 1243-1264, November.
    9. Christopher H. Herbst & Monique Vledder & Karen Campbell & Mirja Sjöblom & Agnes Soucat, 2011. "The Human Resources for Health Crisis in Zambia : An Outcome of Health Worker Entry, Exit, and Performance within the National Health Labor Market," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 5938.
    10. Frédéric Docquier & Hillel Rapoport, 2012. "Globalization, Brain Drain, and Development," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 50(3), pages 681-730, September.
    11. Docquier, Frédéric, 2006. "Brain Drain and Inequality Across Nations," IZA Discussion Papers 2440, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. Elisabetta Lodigiani, 2009. "Diaspora Externalities as a Cornerstone of the New Brain Drain Literature," CREA Discussion Paper Series 09-03, Center for Research in Economic Analysis, University of Luxembourg.
    13. Simplice Asongu, 2014. "The impact of health worker migration on development dynamics: evidence of wealth effects from Africa," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 15(2), pages 187-201, March.
    14. repec:eee:injoed:v:53:y:2017:i:c:p:28-35 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Capuano, Stella & Marfouk, Abdeslam, 2013. "African brain drain and its impact on source countries: What do we know and what do we need to know?," MPRA Paper 47944, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    migration; brain drain; Africa; health professionals;

    JEL classification:

    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration

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