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Determinants of Health Professionals’ Migration in Africa

Author

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  • Asongu Simplice

    (Yaoundé/Cameroun)

Abstract

How do economic prosperity, health expenditure, savings, price-stability, demographic change, democracy, corruption-control, press-freedom, government effectiveness, human development, foreign-aid, physical security, trade openness and financial liberalization play-out in the fight against health-worker crisis when existing emigration levels matter? Despite the acute concern of health-worker crisis in Africa owing to emigration, lack of relevant data has made the subject matter empirically void over the last decades. This paper assesses the theoretical postulations of the WHO report on determinants of health-worker migration. Findings provide a broad range of tools for the fight against health-worker brain-drain. As a policy implication, blanket emigration-control policies are unlikely to succeed equally across countries with different levels of emigration. Thus to be effective, immigration policies should be contingent on the prevailing levels of the crisis and tailored differently across countries with the best and worst records on fighting health worker emigration.

Suggested Citation

  • Asongu Simplice, 2012. "Determinants of Health Professionals’ Migration in Africa," Working Papers of the African Governance and Development Institute. 12/009, African Governance and Development Institute..
  • Handle: RePEc:agd:wpaper:12/009
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Asongu Simplice, 2013. "Globalization and Africa: implications for human development," International Journal of Development Issues, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 12(3), pages 213-238, September.
    2. Simplice A. Asongu, 2013. "Fighting Corruption when Existing Corruption-Control Levels Count: What do Wealth-Effects Tell us in Africa?," Institutions and Economies (formerly known as International Journal of Institutions and Economies), Faculty of Economics and Administration, University of Malaya, vol. 5(3), pages 53-74, October.
    3. Simplice A, Asongu, 2012. "Fighting corruption when existing corruption-control levels count : what do wealth effects tell us?," MPRA Paper 36901, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. repec:pra:mprapa:29011 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Asongu Simplice, 2012. "The political economy of development assistance: peril to government quality dynamics in Africa," Working Papers of the African Governance and Development Institute. 12/008, African Governance and Development Institute..
    6. Simplice A. Asongu & Brian A. Jingwa, 2012. "Population growth and forest sustainability in Africa," International Journal of Green Economics, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 6(2), pages 145-166.
    7. Michael A. Clemens & Gunilla Pettersson, 2006. "A New Database of Health Professional Emigration from Africa," Working Papers 95, Center for Global Development.
    8. repec:pra:mprapa:28896 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Simplice A. Asongu, 2013. "Fighting corruption in Africa: do existing corruption-control levels matter?," International Journal of Development Issues, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 12(1), pages 36-52, April.
    10. Simplice A, Asongu, 2012. "Fighting corruption with cultural dynamics: when legal-origins, religious-influences and existing corruption-control levels matter," MPRA Paper 36893, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Simplice A. Asongu, 2015. "Long-term effects of population growth on aggregate investment dynamics: Selected country evidence for Africa," African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 6(3), pages 225-250, September.
    12. Billger, Sherrilyn M. & Goel, Rajeev K., 2009. "Do existing corruption levels matter in controlling corruption?: Cross-country quantile regression estimates," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(2), pages 299-305, November.
    13. Okada, Keisuke & Samreth, Sovannroeun, 2012. "The effect of foreign aid on corruption: A quantile regression approach," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 115(2), pages 240-243.
    14. Simplice Asongu, 2013. "How Would Population Growth Affect Investment in the Future? Asymmetric Panel Causality Evidence for Africa," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 25(1), pages 14-29.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. Simplice Asongu, 2013. "How Would Population Growth Affect Investment in the Future? Asymmetric Panel Causality Evidence for Africa," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 25(1), pages 14-29.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Welfare; Health; Human Capital; Migration;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D60 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - General
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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