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Globalization and Africa: implications for human development

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  • Simplice A, Asongu

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to assess the effects of trade and financial globalization on human development in 52 African countries using updated data(1996-2010) and a new indicator of human development(adjusted for inequality). Design/methodology/approach – The estimation technique used is a Two-Stage-Least Squares Instrumental Variable methodology. Instruments include: income-levels, legal-origins and religious-dominations. The first-step consists of justifying the choice of the estimation technique with a Hausman-test for endogeneity. In the second-step, we verify that the instrumental variables are exogenous to the endogenous components of explaining variables(globalization dynamic channels) conditional on other covariates(control variables). In the third-step, the strength and validity of the instruments are assessed with the Cragg-Donald and Sargan overidentifying restrictions tests respectively. Robustness checks are ensured by: (1) use of alternative globalization indicators; (2) endogeneity based estimation ; and (3) adoption of two interchangeable sets of instruments. Findings – Findings broadly indicate that while trade globalization improves human development(consistent with the neoliberal theory), financial globalization has the opposite effect(in line with the hegemony thesis). Social implications – Capital accounts should be opened in tandem with financial and institutional development. The investment atmosphere needs improvement to curtail capital flight(about 39%). Other policy implications include: adoption of openness options in a selective and gradual manner, development of some industrial backbone for an import-substitution or export-led industry, emphasis on regional trade and building capacity, development of the agricultural sector with continuous government assistance, building of rural infrastructure, increasing adult literacy rate and developing human resources, fighting corruption and mitigating wastages in government expenditure. Originality/value – These findings are based on very recent data. Usage of the inequality adjusted human development index first published in 2010, corrects past works of the bulk of criticisms inherent in the first index.

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  • Simplice A, Asongu, 2012. "Globalization and Africa: implications for human development," MPRA Paper 36541, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:36541
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Simplice A., Asongu, 2011. "Finance and inequality: exploring pro-poor investment channels in Africa," MPRA Paper 34994, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Greenwood, Jeremy & Jovanovic, Boyan, 1990. "Financial Development, Growth, and the Distribution of Income," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(5), pages 1076-1107, October.
    3. Dani Rodrik & Arvind Subramanian & Francesco Trebbi, 2004. "Institutions Rule: The Primacy of Institutions Over Geography and Integration in Economic Development," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 131-165, June.
    4. Hisako Kai & Shigeyuki Hamori, 2009. "Globalization, financial depth, and inequality in Sub-Saharan Africa," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 29(3), pages 2025-2037.
    5. Asongu Simplice, 2011. "Globalization, financial crisis and contagion: time-dynamic evidence from financial markets of developing countries," Working Papers 11/004, African Governance and Development Institute..
    6. Bhagwati, Jagdish, 1990. "Departures from Multilateralism: Regionalism and Aggressive Unilateralism," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 100(403), pages 1304-1317, December.
    7. Pan-Long Tsai, 1995. "Foreign direct investment and income inequality: Further evidence," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 469-483, March.
    8. Simplice A., Asongu, 2011. "Law, Finance and Investment: does legal origin matter?," MPRA Paper 34698, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Beck, Thorsten & Demirguc-Kunt, Asli & Levine, Ross, 2003. "Law and finance: why does legal origin matter?," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 653-675, December.
    10. Basu, Parantap & Guariglia, Alessandra, 2007. "Foreign Direct Investment, inequality, and growth," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 824-839, December.
    11. Simplice A. Asongu, 2015. "Law,Finance, Economic Growth and Welfare: Why Does Legal Origin Matter?," Institutions and Economies (formerly known as International Journal of Institutions and Economies), Faculty of Economics and Administration, University of Malaya, vol. 7(2), pages 30-55, July.
    12. Simplice Anutechia Asongu, 2012. "Bank Efficiency and Openness in Africa: Do Income Levels Matter?," The Review of Finance and Banking, Academia de Studii Economice din Bucuresti, Romania / Facultatea de Finante, Asigurari, Banci si Burse de Valori / Catedra de Finante, vol. 4(2), pages 115-122, December.
    13. Simplice A. Asongu, 2012. "Law and Finance in Africa," Brussels Economic Review, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles, vol. 55(4), pages 385-408.
    14. Simplice A. ASONGU, 2011. "Why Do French Civil–Law Countries Have Higher Levels Of Financial Efficiency?," Journal of Advanced Research in Law and Economics, ASERS Publishing, vol. 0(2), pages 94-108, December.
    15. M. Sirgy & Dong-Jin Lee & Chad Miller & James Littlefield, 2004. "The Impact of Globalization on a Country's Quality of Life: Toward an Integrated Model," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 68(3), pages 251-298, September.
    16. Simplice A., Asongu, 2011. "Financial determinants of human development in developing countries," MPRA Paper 33949, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    17. Rudiger Dornbusch, 1992. "The Case for Trade Liberalization in Developing Countries," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 6(1), pages 69-85, Winter.
    18. Drusilla K. Brown & Alan V. Deardorff & Robert M. Stern, 2001. "CGE Modeling and Analysis of Multilateral and Regional Negotiating Options," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0108, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kodila-Tedika, Oasis & Asongu, Simplice A. & Cinyabuguma, Matthias & Tchamyou, Vanessa S., 2017. "Financial development and prehistoric geographical isolation: global evidence," Financial History Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 24(03), pages 283-306, December.
    2. Asongu Simplice, 2012. "Determinants of Health Professionals’ Migration in Africa," Working Papers 12/009, African Governance and Development Institute..
    3. Mishra, Sudhanshu K, 2018. "A Simultaneous Equation Model of Globalization, Corruption, Democracy, Human Development and Social Progress," MPRA Paper 84213, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Simplice Asongu, 2014. "Globalization (fighting), corruption and development: How are these phenomena linearly and nonlinearly related in wealth effects?," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 41(3), pages 346-369, May.
    5. Simplice Asongu & Uchenna Efobi & Ibukun Beecroft, 2015. "Inclusive Human Development in Pre-crisis Times of Globalization-driven Debts," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 27(4), pages 428-442, December.
    6. Asongu Simplice, 2015. "Determinants of health professionals’ migration in Africa: a WHO based assessment," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 42(7), pages 666-686, July.
    7. Simplice A. Asongu & Jacinta C. Nwachukwu, 2017. "The Comparative Inclusive Human Development of Globalisation in Africa," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 134(3), pages 1027-1050, December.
    8. repec:afj:journ2:v:14:y:2017:i:1:p:4-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Asongu, Simplice & Nwachukwu, Jacinta, 2017. "Increasing foreign aid for inclusive human development in Africa," MPRA Paper 81193, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. John Ssozi & Simplice A. Asongu, 2016. "The Effects of Remittances on Output per Worker in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Production Function Approach," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 84(3), pages 400-421, September.
    11. Simplice Asongu, 2014. "The Questionable Economics of Development Assistance in Africa: Hot-Fresh Evidence, 1996–2010," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 41(4), pages 455-480, December.
    12. Asongu Simplice, 2013. "Consult your gods: the questionable economics of development assistance in Africa," Working Papers 13/002, African Governance and Development Institute..
    13. Simplice A. Asongu, 2017. "A Survey on Inequality-Adjusted Human Development in Africa," Africagrowth Agenda, Africagrowth Institute, vol. 14(1), pages 4-7.
    14. Simplice A. Asongu, 2014. "Fighting African Capital Flight: Empirics on Benchmarking Policy Harmonization," European Journal of Comparative Economics, Cattaneo University (LIUC), vol. 11(1), pages 93-122, June.
    15. Asongu, Simplice A., 2013. "Inequality, poverty and quality of institutions: which freedom channels of globalization matter for Africa?," European Economic Letters, European Economics Letters Group, vol. 2(1), pages 24-31.
    16. Simplice A. Asongu & Jacinta C. Nwachukwu, 2016. "Foreign aid and governance in Africa," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(1), pages 69-88, January.
    17. Asongu Simplice & Nwachukwu Jacinta, 2017. "Globalization and Inclusive Human Development in Africa," Man and the Economy, De Gruyter, vol. 4(1), pages 1-24, June.
    18. Riccardo Pelizzo & Abel Kinyondo & Zim Nwokora, 2018. "Development in Africa," Working Papers 18/002, African Governance and Development Institute..
    19. Asongu, Simplice & Efobi, Uchenna & Tanankem, Belmondo, 2017. "On the Relationship between Globalisation and the Economic Participation of Women in Sub-Saharan Africa," MPRA Paper 78860, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Globalization; Human development; Africa;

    JEL classification:

    • I30 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General
    • O55 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Africa
    • F30 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - General
    • F10 - International Economics - - Trade - - - General
    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General

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