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New indicators for the mobile banking nexus

  • Simplice A, Asongu

Purpose: We make available new critical macroeconomic financial indicators to the research community. Nothing is more powerful than a phenomenon whose time has come. What is the macroeconomic empirical context of growing mobile banking? Perhaps one of the deepest empirical hollows in the financial development literature has been the equation of financial depth in the perspective of money supply to liquid liabilities. This equation has put on the margin, a burgeoning phenomenon whose time has come: mobile banking. Design/Methodology: We decompose financial depth into formal, semi-formal and informal sectors and then assess the incidence of mobile banking on each constituent. Thus the IFS (2008) definition of the financial system is extended to incorporate an informal financial sector in line with Asongu(2011). Three hypotheses based on eight propositions are tested using a plethora of endogeneity-robust and HAC standard errors estimation techniques. Findings: The informal financial sector (a previously missing component in the definition of money supply: M2) is positively affected by mobile banking, while the incidence of mobile banking is negative on formal and semi-formal financial intermediary development. The paper contributes at the same time to the macroeconomic literature on measuring financial development and responds to the growing field of economic development by means of informal financial sector promotion, microfinance and mobile banking. It suggests a practicable way to disentangle the effects of mobile banking on various financial sectors. Research implications: Since empirical research on the phenomenon has been hampered by lack of data, we make available macroeconomic financial indicators to the research community. The present paper is also in response to the numerous calls on the research gap in the literature that emphasize the need for research on mobile banking. The mobile-finance nexus is gaining momentum, yet relatively little scholarly research explores the incidence of these m-banking/m-payment (systems) on financial development. Practical implications: (1) There is a burgeoning role of informal finance in developing countries. (2) The incidence of the growing phenomenon of mobile banking cannot be effectively assessed at a macroeconomic level by traditional financial development indicators. (3) It is a wake-up call for scholarly research on informal financial intermediary development indicators which will guide monetary policy; since a great chunk of the monetary base (M0) in less developed countries is now captured by mobile banking. Originality/value: New financial indicators for mobile banking assessment based on insufficiencies in the financial development literature: liquid liabilities as applied to developing countries is misleading because a great chunk of the monetary base does not transit through the banking system but via informal networks like the growing phenomenon of mobile banking.

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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 38575.

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Date of creation: 04 May 2012
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:38575
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  1. Asongu Simplice, 2011. "New financial intermediary development indicators for developing countries," Working Papers 11/005, African Governance and Development Institute..
  2. Ang, James B. & McKibbin, Warwick J., 2007. "Financial liberalization, financial sector development and growth: Evidence from Malaysia," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(1), pages 215-233, September.
  3. Asongu, Anutechia Simplice, 2010. "Stock Market Development in Africa: do all macroeconomic financial intermediary determinants matter?," MPRA Paper 26910, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Jensen, Michael C. & Meckling, William H., 1976. "Theory of the firm: Managerial behavior, agency costs and ownership structure," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(4), pages 305-360, October.
  5. Jenny C. Aker & Isaac M. Mbiti, 2010. "Mobile Phones and Economic Development in Africa," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 24(3), pages 207-32, Summer.
  6. Asongu Simplice, 2011. "Law, finance, economic growth and welfare: why does legal origin matter?," Working Papers 11/007, African Governance and Development Institute..
  7. Panicos O. Demetriades & Khaled A.Hussein, 1995. "Does Financial Development Cause Economic Growth? Time-Series Evidence from 16 Countries," Keele Department of Economics Discussion Papers (1995-2001) 95/13, Department of Economics, Keele University.
  8. Asongu Simplice, 2011. "Democracy and Stock Market Performance in African Countries," Working Papers 11/021, African Governance and Development Institute..
  9. J.A. Agbor & J. W. Fedderke & N. Viegi, 2010. "How Does Colonial Origin Matter for Economic Performance in sub-Saharan Africa?," Working Papers 176, Economic Research Southern Africa.
  10. Simplice A., Asongu, 2011. "Law and finance in Africa," MPRA Paper 34080, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  11. Suleiman Abu-Bader & Aamer S. Abu-Qarn, 2008. "Financial Development and Economic Growth: Empirical Evidence from Six MENA Countries," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 12(4), pages 803-817, November.
  12. Simplice A., Simplice, 2011. "Why do French civil-law countries have higher levels of financial efficiency?," MPRA Paper 33950, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  13. Isaac Mbiti & David N. Weil, 2011. "Mobile Banking: The Impact of M-Pesa in Kenya," NBER Working Papers 17129, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Bailey, Martin J. & Rubin, Paul H., 1994. "A positive theory of legal change," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(4), pages 467-477, December.
  15. Thomas Gries & Manfred Kraft & Daniel Meierrieks, 2008. "Linkages between Financial Deepening,Trade Openness and Economic Development: Causality Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa," Working Papers CIE 15, University of Paderborn, CIE Center for International Economics.
  16. Simplice A., Asongu, 2011. "Law, Finance and Investment: does legal origin matter?," MPRA Paper 34698, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  17. Demombynes, Gabriel & Thegeya, Aaron, 2012. "Kenya's mobile revolution and the promise of mobile savings," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5988, The World Bank.
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