IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Who benefits and how much? : how gender affects welfare impacts of a booming textile industry

  • Nicita, Alessandro
  • Razzaz, Susan

Exports of textile products originating from Sub-Saharan African countries have grown dramatically in the past decade. Recent trade initiatives, such as the"African Growth Opportunity Act"and"Everything but Arms,"along with low labor costs and improved integration into world markets, are giving further stimulus to the growth of the textile and apparel industry in Sub-Saharan African countries. Nicita and Razzaz explore the extent to which the poor are also beneficiaries of the export-led growth of particular economic sectors, or whether the poor are unable to reap any of the benefits and therefore fall further behind. They use a methodology that combines the matching methods literature (to identify individuals more likely to fill the new jobs of the expanding sector) with the industry wage premium literature (to quantify the gains of the individuals that move into the expanding sector). The results indicate that a sustained export-driven growth in Madagascar's textile and apparel industry will lead to a substantial increase in the income of poor households, with a consequent decrease in poverty. In a scenario simulating five years of expansion of the textile sector, the authors estimate that more than one million individuals will directly or indirectly receive some benefit. On average, households in which one or more members work in the textile sector get an increase in purchasing power of about 24 percent or US$14 a month. The results further show that benefits are unevenly distributed across male and female workers. Households in which a male member is employed in the textile and apparel industry increase their purchasing power by 36 percent or US$24.5 a month, compared with 22 percent or US$12.2 a month in the case of a female worker.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL:
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 3029.

in new window

Date of creation: 30 Apr 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:3029
Contact details of provider: Postal: 1818 H Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20433
Phone: (202) 477-1234
Web page:

More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
  2. Ronald Oaxaca, 1971. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Urban Labor Markets," Working Papers 396, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  3. Krueger, Alan B & Summers, Lawrence H, 1988. "Efficiency Wages and the Inter-industry Wage Structure," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 56(2), pages 259-93, March.
  4. Bernard Hoekman & Francis Ng & Marcelo Olarreaga, 2002. "Eliminating Excessive Tariffs on Exports of Least Developed Countries," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 16(1), pages 1-21, June.
  5. John P. Haisken-DeNew & Christoph M. Schmidt, 2000. "Interindustry and Interregion Differentials: Mechanics and Interpretation," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 79(3), pages 516-521, August.
  6. Helwege, Jean, 1992. "Sectoral Shifts and Interindustry Wage Differentials," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 10(1), pages 55-84, January.
  7. repec:oup:restud:v:65:y:1998:i:2:p:261-94 is not listed on IDEAS
  8. L. Alan Winters & Neil McCulloch & Andrew McKay, 2004. "Trade Liberalization and Poverty: The Evidence So Far," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 42(1), pages 72-115, March.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:3029. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Roula I. Yazigi)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.