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Gender Wage-Productivity Differentials and Global Integration in China

Author

Listed:
  • Dammert, Ana

    () (Carleton University)

  • Ural Marchand, Beyza

    () (University of Alberta, Department of Economics)

  • Wan, Chi

    () (University of Massachusetts)

Abstract

In the absence of discrimination, there should be no wage-productivity differentials as relative wages should be equal to the relative marginal productivity levels of workers. This paper investigates the role of globalization on the structure and evolution of gender differentials in China by simultaneously estimating demand-side wage and productivity outcomes using nonlinear least squares. The analyses are based on a comprehensive population-wide panel survey of manufacturing firms between the years of 2004 and 2007, covering 94 percent of total industry output and providing an accurate representation of labor demand. The results suggest that more exposure to globalization through increased exports is associated with lower gender wage-productivity differentials, and more exposure through increased foreign investment leads to differentials in favor of female workers. On the other hand, gender discrimination is found to be prevalent among domestically owned and non-exporting firms.

Suggested Citation

  • Dammert, Ana & Ural Marchand, Beyza & Wan, Chi, 2013. "Gender Wage-Productivity Differentials and Global Integration in China," Working Papers 2013-1, University of Alberta, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:albaec:2013_001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    China; gender wage discrimination; globalization; firm ownership;

    JEL classification:

    • D22 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Firm Behavior: Empirical Analysis
    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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