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Inter-industry gender wage gaps by knowledge intensity: discrimination and technology in Korea

Author

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  • Beyza Ural
  • William Horrace
  • Jin Hwa Jung

Abstract

A new gender wage gap decomposition methodology is introduced, which does not suffer from identification problems caused by unobserved nondiscriminatory wage structure. The methodology is used to measure the relative size of Korean gender wage gaps, from 1994 to 2000 across industries, differentiated by industrial knowledge intensity, where knowledge intensity is the extent to which industries produce or employ high-technology products. Korea represents an important case study, since it possesses one of the fastest growing knowledge-intensive economies among industrialized countries. Empirical results indicate that over this period, discrimination (the unexplained portion of the gender wage gaps) in Korea was statistically smaller in knowledge-intensive industries than in industries with low knowledge intensity. Also, discrimination was declining on average over the period. This suggests that continued growth in knowledge-intensive industries in Korea may lead to further declines in the overall gender gap.

Suggested Citation

  • Beyza Ural & William Horrace & Jin Hwa Jung, 2009. "Inter-industry gender wage gaps by knowledge intensity: discrimination and technology in Korea," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(11), pages 1437-1452.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:41:y:2009:i:11:p:1437-1452
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840601019281
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Dammert, Ana C. & Ural Marchand, Beyza & Wan, Chi, 2013. "Gender Wage-Productivity Differentials and Global Integration in China," IZA Discussion Papers 7159, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Bongoh Kye & Erika Arenas & Graciela Teruel & Luis Rubalcava, 2014. "Education, Elderly Health, and Differential Population Aging in South Korea: A Demographic Approach," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 30(26), pages 753-794, March.
    3. Yun, Myeong-Su & Lin, Eric S., 2015. "An Alternative Estimator for Industrial Gender Wage Gaps: A Normalized Regression Approach," IZA Discussion Papers 9381, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Ana C. Dammert & Beyza Ural Marchand, 2015. "Privatization In China: Technology And Gender In The Manufacturing Sector," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 33(2), pages 250-264, April.
    5. Louise Patterson & Brandon Walcutt, 2013. "Korean workplace gender discrimination research analysis: a review of the literature from 1990 to 2010," Asia Pacific Business Review, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(1), pages 85-101, January.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C12 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Hypothesis Testing: General
    • F16 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Labor Market Interactions
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing

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