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Increasing urban wage inequality in China

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  • John Knight
  • Lina Song

Abstract

Two strictly comparable cross‐section household datasets, relating to 1988 and 1995, are used to analyse the increase in wage inequality from an initially low level in urban China over this period of labour market reform. The institutional background and the evolution of policy are described. The rapid growth of wage inequality and the sharp widening of wage structure are quantified. Earnings functions are compared, and the increase in both the level and the inequality of wages are decomposed into their constituent elements. Quantile regression analysis is conducted to throw light on the relationships between the observed and the unobserved determinants of wages. Distinctions are made between the variables likely to represent human capital, discrimination, and segmentation. The evidence suggests that productive characteristics were increasingly rewarded as marketization occurred, but that discrimination and segmentation also grew. The move towards a fully‐fledged labour market was by no means complete.

Suggested Citation

  • John Knight & Lina Song, 2003. "Increasing urban wage inequality in China," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 11(4), pages 597-619, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:etrans:v:11:y:2003:i:4:p:597-619
    DOI: 10.1111/j.0967-0750.2003.00168.x
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.0967-0750.2003.00168.x
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