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The effect of foreign aid on corruption: A quantile regression approach

  • Okada, Keisuke
  • Samreth, Sovannroeun

This paper investigates the effect of foreign aid on corruption using a quantile regression method. Our estimation results illustrate that foreign aid generally lessens corruption and, in particular, its reduction effect is larger in countries with low levels of corruption. In addition, considering foreign aid by donors, our analysis indicates that while multilateral aid has a larger reduction impact on corruption, bilateral aid from the world’s leading donors, such as France, the United Kingdom, and the United States, has no significant effect on corruption. However, bilateral aid from Japan is shown to be statistically significant in lessening corruption.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/27969/1/MPRA_paper_27969.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 27969.

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Date of creation: 08 Jan 2011
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:27969
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  1. Svensson, Jakob, 2000. "Foreign aid and rent-seeking," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(2), pages 437-461, August.
  2. Pierre Richard AGÉNOR & Nihal BAYRAKTAR & Karim EL AYNAOUI, . "Roads out of Poverty? Assessing the Link between Aid, Public Investment, Growth and Poverty Reduction," EcoMod2004 330600003, EcoMod.
  3. Alesina, Alberto & Weder, Beatrice, 2002. "Do Corrupt Governments Receive Less Foreign Aid?," Scholarly Articles 4553011, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  4. Alesina, Alberto & Dollar, David, 2000. " Who Gives Foreign Aid to Whom and Why?," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 5(1), pages 33-63, March.
  5. Alberto Chong & Mark Gradstein & Cecilia Calderon, 2009. "Can foreign aid reduce income inequality and poverty?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 140(1), pages 59-84, July.
  6. Billger, Sherrilyn M. & Goel, Rajeev K., 2009. "Do existing corruption levels matter in controlling corruption?: Cross-country quantile regression estimates," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(2), pages 299-305, November.
  7. Andrei Shleifer & Robert W. Vishny, 1998. "The Quality of Government," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1847, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  8. Mo, Pak Hung, 2001. "Corruption and Economic Growth," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 66-79, March.
  9. Karuna Gomanee & Sourafel Girma & Oliver Morrissey, 2006. "Aid, Public Spending and Human Welfare: Evidence from Quantile Regressions," Working Papers id:761, eSocialSciences.
  10. Boriana Yontcheva & Nadia Masud, 2005. "Does Foreign Aid Reduce Poverty? Empirical Evidence From Nongovernmental and Bilateral Aid," IMF Working Papers 05/100, International Monetary Fund.
  11. AlÌcia Adserý, 2003. "Are You Being Served? Political Accountability and Quality of Government," Journal of Law, Economics and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(2), pages 445-490, October.
  12. Koenker, Roger W & Bassett, Gilbert, Jr, 1978. "Regression Quantiles," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(1), pages 33-50, January.
  13. Danila Serra, 2006. "Empirical determinants of corruption: A sensitivity analysis," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 126(1), pages 225-256, January.
  14. Simeon Djankov & José Garcia Montalvo & Marta Reynal-Querol, 2005. "The curse of aid," Economics Working Papers 870, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
  15. Gomanee, Karuna & Morrissey, Oliver & Mosley, Paul & Verschoor, Arjan, 2005. "Aid, Government Expenditure, and Aggregate Welfare," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 355-370, March.
  16. Treisman, Daniel, 2000. "The causes of corruption: a cross-national study," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(3), pages 399-457, June.
  17. Stephen Knack, 2001. "Aid Dependence and the Quality of Governance: Cross-Country Empirical Tests," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 68(2), pages 310-329, October.
  18. Mauro, Paolo, 1995. "Corruption and Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 110(3), pages 681-712, August.
  19. Tavares, Jose, 2003. "Does foreign aid corrupt?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 79(1), pages 99-106, April.
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