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The impact of health worker migration on development dynamics: evidence of wealth-effects from Africa

  • Asongu Simplice



This paper examines three relevant hypotheses on the incidence of health worker migration on human development and economic prosperity (at macro and micro levels) in Africa. Owing to lack of relevant data on Health Human Resource (HHR) migration for the continent, the subject matter has remained empirically void over the last decades despite the acute concern of health professional emigration. Using quantile regression, the following findings have been established. (1) The effect of HHR emigration is positive (negative) at low (high) levels of economic growth. (2) HHR emigration improves (mitigates) human development (GDP per capita growth) in low (high) quantiles of the distribution. (3) Specific differences in effects are found in top quantiles of human development and low quantiles of GDP per capita growth where, the physician (nurse) emigration elasticities of development are positive (negative) and negative (positive) respectively. As a policy implication, blanked health-worker emigration control policies are unlikely to succeed across countries with different levels of human development and economic prosperity. Hence, the policies should be contingent on the prevailing levels of development and tailored differently across the most and least developed African countries.

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Paper provided by African Governance and Development Institute. in its series Working Papers with number 12/037.

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Length: 32
Date of creation: 18 Apr 2012
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in the European Journal of Health Economics
Handle: RePEc:agd:wpaper:12/037
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  1. Asongu Simplice, 2010. "Bank Efficiency and Openness in Africa: Do Income Levels Matter?," Working Papers 10/001, African Governance and Development Institute., revised 18 Dec 2011.
  2. David Dollar & Craig Burnside, 2000. "Aid, Policies, and Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 847-868, September.
  3. Asongu Simplice, 2012. "Fighting corruption with cultural dynamics: when legal-origins, religious-influences and existing corruption-control levels matter," Working Papers 12/015, African Governance and Development Institute..
  4. Okada, Keisuke & Samreth, Sovannroeun, 2011. "The effect of foreign aid on corruption: A quantile regression approach," MPRA Paper 27969, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Asongu Simplice, 2012. "Fighting corruption when existing corruption-control levels count : what do wealth effects tell us?," Working Papers 12/013, African Governance and Development Institute..
  6. Michael A. Clemens & Gunilla Pettersson, 2006. "A New Database of Health Professional Emigration from Africa," Working Papers 95, Center for Global Development.
  7. Albanesi, Stefania, 2002. "Inflation and Inequality," CEPR Discussion Papers 3470, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  8. Michael Binder & Georgios Georgiadis, 2010. "Determinants of Human Development: Insights from State-Dependent Panel Models," Human Development Research Papers (2009 to present) HDRP-2010-24, Human Development Report Office (HDRO), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).
  9. Asongu Simplice, 2012. "Fighting corruption when existing corruption-control levels count: what do wealth-effects tell us in Africa?," Working Papers 12/014, African Governance and Development Institute..
  10. Ales Bulir, 1998. "Income Inequality: Does Inflation Matter?," IMF Working Papers 98/7, International Monetary Fund.
  11. Johnson, D. Gale, 2002. "Globalization: what it is and who benefits," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 427-439.
  12. Robert J. Barro, 1996. "Determinants of Economic Growth: A Cross-Country Empirical Study," NBER Working Papers 5698, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Asongu Simplice, 2012. "Reversed Economics and Inhumanity of Development Assistance in Africa," Working Papers 12/034, African Governance and Development Institute..
  14. Simplice A, Asongu, 2012. "Fighting corruption in Africa: do existing corruption-control levels matter?," MPRA Paper 36900, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  15. Billger, Sherrilyn M. & Goel, Rajeev K., 2009. "Do existing corruption levels matter in controlling corruption?: Cross-country quantile regression estimates," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(2), pages 299-305, November.
  16. Koenker, Roger W & Bassett, Gilbert, Jr, 1978. "Regression Quantiles," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(1), pages 33-50, January.
  17. Simplice A. Asongu, 2013. "Investment And Inequality In Africa: Which Financial Channels Are Good For The Poor?," The African Finance Journal, Africagrowth Institute, vol. 15(2), pages 43-65.
  18. Koenker,Roger, 2005. "Quantile Regression," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521845731.
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