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Terrorism and capital flight from Africa

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  • Uchenna Efobi
  • Simplice Asongu

Abstract

We assess the effects of terrorism on capital flight in a panel of 29 African countries for which data is available for the period 1987–2008. The terrorism dynamics entail domestic, transnational, unclear and total terrorisms. The empirical evidence is based on Generalised Method of Moments (GMM) with forward orthogonal deviations and Quantile regressions (QR). The following findings are established. First, for GMM, domestic, transnational, unclear and total terrorisms consistently increase capital flight. Second, for QR, with the exception of transnational terrorism for which a positive effect on capital flight is apparent in the 0.90th quintile, terrorism dynamics affect capital flight in low quintiles of the capital flight distribution. In other words, terrorism increases capital flight for the most part when initial levels of capital flight are low. Policy implications are discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Uchenna Efobi & Simplice Asongu, 2016. "Terrorism and capital flight from Africa," International Economics, CEPII research center, issue 148, pages 81-94.
  • Handle: RePEc:cii:cepiie:2016-q4-148-6
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    Cited by:

    1. Simplice Asongu & Joseph Amankwah-Amoah, 2016. "Military expenditure, terrorism and capital flight: Insights from Africa," Working Papers 16/018, African Governance and Development Institute..
    2. Simplice Asongu & Vanessa Tchamyou & Ndemaze Asongu & Nina Tchamyou, 2017. "The Comparative African Economics of Inclusive Development and Military Expenditure in Fighting Terrorism," Journal of African Development, African Finance and Economic Association, vol. 19(2), pages 77-91.
    3. Simplice Asongu & Jacinta C. Nwachukwu, 2017. "Fuel Exports, Aid and Terrorism," Working Papers 17/016, African Governance and Development Institute..
    4. repec:eee:riibaf:v:42:y:2017:i:c:p:1355-1366 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Asongu, Simplice A. & Nwachukwu, Jacinta C., 2017. "The Impact of Terrorism on Governance in African Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 99(C), pages 253-270.
    6. repec:kap:jincot:v:17:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s10842-016-0240-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Simplice Asongu & Jacinta C. Nwachukwu, 2016. "Transfer Mispricing as an Argument for Corporate Social Responsibility," Working Papers 16/031, African Governance and Development Institute..
    8. Asongu, Simplice A. & Amankwah-Amoah, Joseph, 2018. "Mitigating capital flight through military expenditure: Insight from 37 African countries," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 38-53.
    9. Simplice A. Asongu & Jacinta C. Nwachukwu, 2017. "Fighting Capital Flight in Africa: Evidence from Bundling and Unbundling Governance," Journal of Industry, Competition and Trade, Springer, vol. 17(3), pages 305-323, September.
    10. Tchamyou, Vanessa S. & Asongu, Simplice A., 2017. "Conditional market timing in the mutual fund industry," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 1355-1366.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Africa; Capital flight; Foreign capital; Terrorism; Violence;

    JEL classification:

    • C50 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - General
    • D74 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Conflict; Conflict Resolution; Alliances; Revolutions
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • N40 - Economic History - - Government, War, Law, International Relations, and Regulation - - - General, International, or Comparative
    • O55 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Africa

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