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Fighting Terrorism: Are Military Measures Effective? Empirical Evidence From Turkey

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  • Mete Feridun
  • Muhammad Shahbaz

Abstract

The present article aims at investigating the causal relationship between defense spending and terrorism in Turkey using the Autoregressive Distributed Lag (ARDL) bounds testing procedure and Granger-causality analysis. The findings reveal that there exists a unidirectional causality running form terrorist attacks to defense spending as expected, but not vice versa. In the light of this finding it can be inferred that military anti-terrorism measures alone are not sufficient to prevent terrorism.

Suggested Citation

  • Mete Feridun & Muhammad Shahbaz, 2010. "Fighting Terrorism: Are Military Measures Effective? Empirical Evidence From Turkey," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(2), pages 193-205.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:defpea:v:21:y:2010:i:2:p:193-205 DOI: 10.1080/10242690903568884
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