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No Good Deed Goes Unpunished: Refugees, Humanitarian Aid, and Terrorism

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  • Seung-Whan Choi

    (Department of Political Science, University of Illinois at Chicago)

  • Idean Salehyan

    (Department of Political Science, University of North Texas)

Abstract

We examine the consequences of hosting refugees for domestic and international terrorism. In line with the old saying, “no good deed goes unpunished†, we argue that the infusion of aid resources provides militant groups with opportunities for looting and for attacking foreign targets. A cross-national, time-series data analysis of 154 countries for the years 1970–2007 shows evidence that countries with many refugees are more likely to experience both domestic and international terrorism. This finding implies that while the international community should strive to reduce the number of refugees by preventing the eruption of major conflict events, individual countries should find a way of maintaining the balance between humanitarianism toward refugees and providing safe, secure environments for refugees and those that assist them.

Suggested Citation

  • Seung-Whan Choi & Idean Salehyan, 2013. "No Good Deed Goes Unpunished: Refugees, Humanitarian Aid, and Terrorism," Conflict Management and Peace Science, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 30(1), pages 53-75, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:compsc:v:30:y:2013:i:1:p:53-75
    DOI: 10.1177/0738894212456951
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Simplice A. Asongu & Sara Le Roux & Pritam Singh, 2020. "Fighting terrorism in Africa: complementarity between inclusive development, military expenditure and political stability," Research Africa Network Working Papers 20/004, Research Africa Network (RAN).
    2. Simplice A. Asongu & Jacinta C. Nwachukwu, 2017. "Fuel Exports, Aid and Terrorism," Research Africa Network Working Papers 17/016, Research Africa Network (RAN).
    3. Simplice Asongu & Ivo J. Leke, 2019. "Can Foreign Aid Dampen the Threat of Terrorism to International Trade? Evidence from 78 Developing Countries," Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory and Practice, , vol. 18(1), pages 32-55, June.
    4. Simplice A. ASONGU & Jacinta NWACHUKWU & Nicholas BIEKPE, 2019. "Foreign Aid, Terrorism And Growth: Conditional Evidence From Quantile Regression," Annals of Public and Cooperative Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 90(3), pages 457-486, September.
    5. Asongu, Simplice A. & Amankwah-Amoah, Joseph, 2018. "Mitigating capital flight through military expenditure: Insight from 37 African countries," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 38-53.
    6. Simplice A. Asongu & Vanessa S. Tchamyou & Ndemaze Asongu & Nina Tchamyou, 2018. "The Comparative African Economics of Governance in Fighting Terrorism," Research Africa Network Working Papers 18/055, Research Africa Network (RAN).
    7. Asongu, Simplice A. & Biekpe, Nicholas, 2018. "Globalization and terror in Africa," International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 156(C), pages 86-97.
    8. Asongu, Simplice A. & Nwachukwu, Jacinta C., 2017. "The Impact of Terrorism on Governance in African Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 99(C), pages 253-270.
    9. Simplice A. Asongu & Jacinta C. Nwachukwu, 2016. "Conditional linkages between iron ore exports, foreign aid and terrorism," Mineral Economics, Springer;Raw Materials Group (RMG);Luleå University of Technology, vol. 29(2), pages 57-70, December.
    10. Efobi, Uchenna & Asongu, Simplice, 2016. "Terrorism and capital flight from Africa," International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 148(C), pages 81-94.
    11. Asongu, Simplice & Tchamyou, Vanessa & Asongu, Ndemaze & Tchamyou, Nina, 2019. "Fighting terrorism in Africa when existing terrorism levels matter," MPRA Paper 102026, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Laura DIACONU (MAXIM), 2015. "The Refugees And The Economic Growth In The Eu States: Challenges And Opportunities," CES Working Papers, Centre for European Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, vol. 7(4), pages 881-890, December.
    13. Rafat Mahmood & Michael Jetter, 2020. "Communications Technology and Terrorism," Journal of Conflict Resolution, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 64(1), pages 127-166, January.
    14. Simplice Asongu & Vanessa Tchamyou & Ndemaze Asongu & Nina Tchamyou, 2017. "The Comparative African Economics of Inclusive Development and Military Expenditure in Fighting Terrorism," Journal of African Development, African Finance and Economic Association (AFEA), vol. 19(2), pages 77-91.
    15. Carmignani, Fabrizio & Kler, Parvinder, 2016. "Surrounded by wars: Quantifying the role of spatial conflict spillovers," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 7-16.
    16. Simplice Asongu & Vanessa Tchamyou & Ndemaze Asongu & Nina Tchamyou, 2019. "Fighting terrorism in Africa: evidence from bundling and unbundling institutions," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 56(3), pages 883-933, March.
    17. Simplice Asongu & Oasis Kodila-Tedika, 2017. "Trade, aid and terror," International Journal of Development Issues, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 16(1), pages 2-24, April.
    18. Olaf J. de Groot & Carlos Bozzoli & Tilman Bruck, 2015. "The Global Economic Burden of Violent Conflict," HiCN Working Papers 199, Households in Conflict Network.
    19. Simplice Asongu & Jacinta Nwachukwu & Sara le Roux, 2019. "The role of inclusive development and military expenditure in modulating the effect of terrorism on governance," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 46(3), pages 681-709, August.
    20. Martin-Shields, Charles, 2017. "State fragility as a cause of forced displacement: identifying theoretical channels for empirical research," Discussion Papers 30/2017, German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE).
    21. Asongu, Simplice A. & Tchamyou, Vanessa S. & Minkoua N., Jules R. & Asongu, Ndemaze & Tchamyou, Nina P., 2018. "Fighting terrorism in Africa: Benchmarking policy harmonization," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 492(C), pages 1931-1957.
    22. Fabrizio Carmignani & Parvinder Kler, 2017. "The spillover of war in time and space: exploring some open issues," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(3), pages 273-288, January.

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    Keywords

    humanitarian aid; refugees; terrorism;

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