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Natural resource rents, political regimes and terrorism in Africa

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  • Ajide, Kazeem B.
  • Adenuga, Juliet I.
  • Raheem, Ibrahim D.

Abstract

The study adds to the stock of existing literature on the supposed crises-inducing role of natural resource rents, by specifically linking same to political regime and growth of terrorist attacks for a panel of forty-nine (49) African economies for the period, 1980–2012. To avail room for more policy implications, four terrorism indicators, namely: domestic, international, uncertain, and total, are used on a negative binomial regression estimator due to the count nature of terrorism data. Our findings reveal the following: first, natural resource rents have unconditional effects on transnational and total terrorism. Second, political regimes equally exert unconditional impacts on domestic and total terrorism, with both democracy and autocracy mitigating the terror-inducing effects on the one hand, with anocracy acting as a magnifying apparatus on the other hand. Third, the interaction between natural resource rents and anocracy has negative marginal effects on both domestic and total terrorism measures. Fourth, the corresponding effects of interaction, however, turned positive for both domestic and total terrorism. Lastly, the considered conditioning variables equally received extensive empirical backings but not on an equal basis. Thus, understanding the terror context of natural resource rents and the dynamics of political regimes represent formidable counterterrorist measures.

Suggested Citation

  • Ajide, Kazeem B. & Adenuga, Juliet I. & Raheem, Ibrahim D., 2020. "Natural resource rents, political regimes and terrorism in Africa," International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 162(C), pages 50-66.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:inteco:v:162:y:2020:i:c:p:50-66
    DOI: 10.1016/j.inteco.2020.04.003
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    3. Kazeem Bello Ajide & Olorunfemi Yasiru Alimi, 2023. "Inflation, inflation volatility and terrorism in Africa," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 28(1), pages 493-509, January.
    4. Yawovi Mawussé Isaac Amedanou & Yannick Bouterige & Bertrand Laporte, 2023. "Institutional and political drivers for copper government take: new evidence for African and Latin American countries," Working Papers hal-04213102, HAL.
    5. Sun, Chunxia & Abbas, Hafiz Syed Mohsin & Xu, Xiaodong & Abbas, Sadia, 2022. "The impact of socio-economic and fractionalization determinants on terrorism in ESNA," Socio-Economic Planning Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 79(C).
    6. Ajide, Kazeem Bello & Alimi, Olorunfemi Yasiru, 2021. "Environmental impact of natural resources on terrorism in Africa," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 73(C).
    7. Tabash, Mosab I. & Mesagan, Ekundayo Peter & Farooq, Umar, 2022. "Dynamic linkage between natural resources, economic complexity, and economic growth: Empirical evidence from Africa," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 78(C).
    8. Kazeem B. Ajide & Olorunfemi Y. Alimi, 2021. "Income inequality, human capital and terrorism in Africa: Beyond exploratory analytics," International Economics, CEPII research center, issue 165, pages 218-240.
    9. Rexford Abaidoo & Elvis Kwame Agyapong, 2022. "Commodity price volatility, inflation uncertainty and political stability," International Review of Economics, Springer;Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS), vol. 69(3), pages 351-381, September.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Natural resource rents; Political regimes; Terrorism; Negative binomial regression;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities
    • O55 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Africa
    • P51 - Political Economy and Comparative Economic Systems - - Comparative Economic Systems - - - Comparative Analysis of Economic Systems
    • Q34 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Natural Resources and Domestic and International Conflicts

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