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Agricultural Productivity, Comparative Advantage, and Economic Growth

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  • Kiminori Matsuyama

Abstract

The role of agricultural productivity in economic development is addressed in a two-sector model of endogenous growth in which a) preferences are non-homothetic and income elasticity of demand for the agricultural good is less than unitary, and b) the engine of growth is learning-by-doing in the manufacturing sector. For the closed economy case, the model predicts a positive link between agricultural productivity and economic growth, while, for the small open economy case, it predicts a negative link. This suggests that the openness of an economy should be an important factor when planning development strategy and predicting growth performance.

Suggested Citation

  • Kiminori Matsuyama, 1990. "Agricultural Productivity, Comparative Advantage, and Economic Growth," Discussion Papers 934, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
  • Handle: RePEc:nwu:cmsems:934
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Agricultural Revolution; Dutch Disease; Endogenous Growth; Engel's Law; Industrail Revolution; Learning-by-doing; Regional Divergence.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F43 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Economic Growth of Open Economies
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models

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