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Why Did West Extend the Franchise? Democracy, Ineqiality and Growth in Historical Perspective

Author

Listed:
  • Acemoglu, D.
  • Robinson, J.

Abstract

During the nineteeth century, most Western societies extended the franchise, a decision which led to unprecedented redistributive programs. We argue that these political reforms can be viewed as strategic decisions by political elites to prevent widespread social unrest and revolution.

Suggested Citation

  • Acemoglu, D. & Robinson, J., 1997. "Why Did West Extend the Franchise? Democracy, Ineqiality and Growth in Historical Perspective," Working papers 97-23, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:mit:worpap:97-23
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    DEMOCRACY ; ECONOMIC GROWTH ; REVOLUTION;

    JEL classification:

    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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