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Economic growth and terrorism: domestic, international, and suicide

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  • Seung-Whan Choi

Abstract

This study evaluates the controversial issue of whether economic growth exerts a dampening effect on terrorism. Unlike previous studies, it conceptualizes economic growth into two sectors (agricultural and industrial) and categorizes terrorism into three forms (domestic, international, and suicide). It offers a modified theory of hard targets, where richer industrial, but not richer agricultural, countries are more likely to attract suicide attacks. A cross-national, time-series data analysis of 127 countries for 1970–2007 shows evidence that when countries enjoy high levels of industrial growth, they are less disposed to domestic and international terrorist events, but are more likely to experience suicide attacks. These findings indicate that economic growth is not a cure-all solution for terrorism because it may be associated in some instances with more terrorist incidents. Nonetheless, healthy economic conditions are, without doubt, beneficial to the war on terrorism because the majority of suicide attacks occur in only a few countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Seung-Whan Choi, 2015. "Economic growth and terrorism: domestic, international, and suicide," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 67(1), pages 157-181.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:67:y:2015:i:1:p:157-181.
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/oep/gpu036
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    Cited by:

    1. Simplice A. Asongu & Jacinta C. Nwachukwu & Chris Pyke, 2019. "The Right to Life: Global Evidence on the Role of Security Officers and the Police in Modulating the Effect of Insecurity on Homicide," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 143(2), pages 727-740, June.
    2. Simplice A. Asongu & Jacinta C. Nwachukwu, 2017. "Fuel Exports, Aid and Terrorism," Research Africa Network Working Papers 17/016, Research Africa Network (RAN).
    3. Simplice Asongu & Jacinta Nwachukwu, 2018. "Fighting Terrorism: Empirics on Policy Harmonisation," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 19(3), pages 237-259, August.
    4. Simplice A. Asongu & Uchenna R. Efobi & Ibukun Beecroft, 2017. "Aid in Modulating the Impact of Terrorism on FDI: No Positive Thresholds, No Policy," Research Africa Network Working Papers 17/061, Research Africa Network (RAN).
    5. Asongu, Simplice & Efobi, Uchenna & Beecroft, Ibukun, 2015. "FDI, Aid, Terrorism: Conditional Threshold Evidence from Developing Countries," MPRA Paper 67856, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Simplice Asongu & Ivo Leke, 2018. "Can foreign aid dampen the threat of terrorism to international trade? Evidence from 78 developing countries," Working Papers of the African Governance and Development Institute. 18/032, African Governance and Development Institute..
    7. Simplice A. Asongu & Jacinta C. Nwachukwu, 2016. "Conditional linkages between iron ore exports, foreign aid and terrorism," Mineral Economics, Springer;Raw Materials Group (RMG);Luleå University of Technology, vol. 29(2), pages 57-70, December.
    8. repec:spr:qualqt:v:52:y:2018:i:5:d:10.1007_s11135-017-0671-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Asongu, Simplice & Odhiambo, Nicholas, 2018. "Tourism and Social Media in the World: An Empirical Investigation," MPRA Paper 92344, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Simplice A. Asongu & Vanessa S. Tchamyou & Jules R. Minkoua N & Ndemaze Asongu & Nina P. Tchamyou, 2017. "Fighting terrorism in Africa: benchmarking policy harmonization," Research Africa Network Working Papers 17/049, Research Africa Network (RAN).
    11. Simplice A. ASONGU & Jacinta NWACHUKWU & Nicholas BIEKPE, 2019. "Foreign Aid, Terrorism And Growth: Conditional Evidence From Quantile Regression," Annals of Public and Cooperative Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 90(3), pages 457-486, September.
    12. Simplice A. Asongu & Uchenna R. Efobi & Ibukun Beecroft, 2017. "Aid in Modulating the Impact of Terrorism on FDI: No Positive Thresholds, No Policy," Research Africa Network Working Papers 17/061, Research Africa Network (RAN).
    13. Asongu, Simplice & Tchamyou, Vanessa & Asongu, Ndemaze & Tchamyou, Nina, 2018. "The Comparative African Economics of Governance in Fighting Terrorism," MPRA Paper 92346, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Simplice A. Asongu & Jacinta C. Nwachukwu, 2018. "Mitigating externalities of terrorism on tourism: global evidence from police, security officers and armed service personnel," Research Africa Network Working Papers 18/036, Research Africa Network (RAN).
    15. repec:eme:ijdipp:ijdi-08-2016-0046 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Simplice Asongu & Oasis Kodila-Tedika, 2017. "Trade, aid and terror," International Journal of Development Issues, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 16(1), pages 2-24, April.
    17. Simplice A. Asongu & Stella-Maris I. Orim & Rexon T. Nting, 2019. "Terrorism and social media: global evidence," Working Papers of the African Governance and Development Institute. 19/026, African Governance and Development Institute..
    18. Simplice A. Asongu & Joseph Nnanna & Nicholas Biekpe & Paul N. Acha-Anyi, 2018. "Contemporary Drivers of Global Tourism: Evidence from Terrorism and Peace Factors," Research Africa Network Working Papers 18/046, Research Africa Network (RAN).
    19. Asongu, Simplice A. & Tchamyou, Vanessa S. & Minkoua N., Jules R. & Asongu, Ndemaze & Tchamyou, Nina P., 2018. "Fighting terrorism in Africa: Benchmarking policy harmonization," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 492(C), pages 1931-1957.

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