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Migration and Development Research Is Moving Far beyond Remittances - Working Paper 365

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  • Michael Clemens, Çaglar Özden, and Hillel Rapoport

Abstract

Research on migration and development has recently changed, in two ways. First, it has grown sharply in volume, emerging as a proper subfield. Second, while it once embraced principally rural-urban migration and international remittances, migration and development research has broadened to consider a range of international development processes. These include human capital investment, global diaspora networks, circular or temporary migration, and the transfer of technology and cultural norms. To introduce a special issue of World Development on migration and development, we present a selection of frontier migrant-and-development research that instantiates these trends.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Clemens, Çaglar Özden, and Hillel Rapoport, 2014. "Migration and Development Research Is Moving Far beyond Remittances - Working Paper 365," Working Papers 365, Center for Global Development.
  • Handle: RePEc:cgd:wpaper:365
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Gabriella Berloffa & Sara Giunti, 2017. "Remittances and healthcare consumption: human capital investment or responses to shocks? Evidence from Peru," DEM Working Papers 2017/12, Department of Economics and Management.
    2. repec:bla:jecsur:v:32:y:2018:i:3:p:727-766 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Priebe, Jan & Rudolf, Robert, 2015. "Does the Chinese Diaspora Speed Up Growth in Host Countries?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 249-262.
    4. Hübler, Michael, 2016. "Does Migration Support Technology Diffusion in Developing Countries?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 148-162.
    5. Ouyang, Alice Y. & Paul, Saumik, 2018. "The Effect of Skilled Emigration on Real Exchange Rates through the Wage Channel," ADBI Working Papers 823, Asian Development Bank Institute.
    6. Bove, Vincenzo & Elia, Leandro, 2017. "Migration, Diversity, and Economic Growth," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 227-239.
    7. Ardiana Gashi & Nick Adnett, 2015. "The Determinants of Return Migration: Evidence for Kosovo," Croatian Economic Survey, The Institute of Economics, Zagreb, vol. 17(2), pages 57-81, December.
    8. Thierry Baudassé & Rémi Bazillier & Ismaël Issifou, 2018. "Migration And Institutions: Exit And Voice (From Abroad)?," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(3), pages 727-766, July.
    9. repec:bla:asiaps:v:5:y:2018:i:3:p:393-407 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Andrews, Abigail L., 2016. "Legacies of Inequity: How Hometown Political Participation and Land Distribution Shape Migrants’ Paths into Wage Labor," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 318-332.
    11. repec:eee:jimfin:v:89:y:2018:i:c:p:139-153 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    migration; development; poverty; mobility; brain drain; skill; education; remittances; labor; overseas;

    JEL classification:

    • F6 - International Economics - - Economic Impacts of Globalization
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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