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Stirring Up a Hornets' Nest: Geographic Distribution of Crime

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  • Sebastian Galiani
  • Ivan Lopez Cruz
  • Gustavo Torrens

Abstract

This paper develops a model of the geographic distribution of crime in an urban area. When the police protect some neighborhoods (concentrated protection), the city becomes segregated. When the police are evenly deployed across the city (dispersed protection), an integrated city emerges. Unequal societies face a difficult dilemma in that concentrated protection maximizes aggregate welfare but exacerbates social disparities. Taxes and subsidies that can be employed to offset the disadvantages to agents left unprotected. Private security makes an integrated city less likely. Even under dispersed public protection, rich agents may use private security to endogenously isolate themselves in closed neighborhoods.

Suggested Citation

  • Sebastian Galiani & Ivan Lopez Cruz & Gustavo Torrens, 2016. "Stirring Up a Hornets' Nest: Geographic Distribution of Crime," NBER Working Papers 22166, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:22166
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Amodio, Francesco, 2019. "Crime protection investment spillovers: Theory and evidence from the City of Buenos Aires," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 159(C), pages 626-649.
    2. Sanfelice, Viviane, 2019. "Are safe routes effective? Assessing the effects of Chicago’s Safe Passage program on local crimes," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 164(C), pages 357-373.
    3. Blesse, Sebastian & Diegmann, André, 2019. "Police reorganization and crime: Evidence from police station closures," ZEW Discussion Papers 18-044, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
    4. Deng, Liuchun & Sun, Yufeng, 2017. "Criminal network formation and optimal detection policy: The role of cascade of detection," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 141(C), pages 43-63.
    5. Ignacio Munyo & Martín Rossi, 2016. "Police-Monitored Cameras and Crime," Working Papers 126, Universidad de San Andres, Departamento de Economia, revised Oct 2018.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • K42 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - Illegal Behavior and the Enforcement of Law
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)

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